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Come, Follow Me – Old Testament (August)

Welcome to August!
Links for other months: January, February, March, April, May, June, July

August, Week 1

Day 1

Primary
1. Read Job 1 and Job 2.
2. Job, a righteous man, experienced severe trials and afflictions. Job lost all of his property, his children died, and he suffered great physical agony. In the midst of his suffering, Job was visited by three friends. Though Job’s friends intended to comfort him, they accused him of transgression.
3. Watch the video about Job.
4. Listen to the “Books of the Old Testament” song. Be sure you can sing it through Job!

Youth
1. Read Job 1 and Job 2.
2. It’s natural to wonder why bad things happen to good people—or for that matter, why good things happen to bad people. Why would God, who is just, allow that? Questions like these are explored through the experience of Job, one of those good people to whom bad things happened. Job, a righteous, God-fearing man, experienced severe trials and afflictions. Job lost all of his property, his children died, and he suffered great physical agony. In the midst of his suffering, Job was visited by three friends. Because of Job’s trials, his friends wondered if he was really good after all. Job asserted his own righteousness and wondered if God is really just after all. But despite his suffering and wondering, Job maintained his integrity and faith in Jesus Christ.
3. Elder Richard G. Scott of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles said:

When you face adversity, you can be led to ask many questions. Some serve a useful purpose; others do not. To ask, Why does this have to happen to me? Why do I have to suffer this, now? What have I done to cause this? will lead you into blind alleys. It really does no good to ask questions that reflect opposition to the will of God. Rather ask, What am I to do? What am I to learn from this experience? What am I to change? Whom am I to help? How can I remember my many blessings in times of trial? …

This life is an experience in profound trust—trust in Jesus Christ, trust in His teachings, trust in our capacity as led by the Holy Spirit to obey those teachings. … To trust means to obey willingly without knowing the end from the beginning (see Prov. 3:5–7). To produce fruit, your trust in the Lord must be more powerful and enduring than your confidence in your own personal feelings and experience” (“Trust in the Lord,” Ensign, Nov. 1995, 17).

4. Listen to the “Books of the Old Testament” song. Be sure you can sing it through Job!

Day 2

Primary
1. Read Job 19:22-27 and Job 21:1-9.
2. Again and again, Job’s friends came to him and suggested that he had so many trials because he was wicked. Job responded that he had faith in God, and knew that he would be resurrected one day. He knew that wicked people were sometimes happy, and righteous people are sometimes unhappy. Job had a testimony of Jesus Christ, and that gave him strength through his trials.
3. Listen to the song “My Redeemer Lives.”

Youth
1. Read Job 19:22-27 and Job 21:1-9.
2. After suffering great afflictions, Job defended himself against his friends’ accusations that he was only suffering because he was wicked. Job knew that wicked people sometimes prosper, and righteous people sometimes undergo great trials. His suffering did not weaken his testimony of his Redeemer, Jesus Christ, or his faith that he would be resurrected some day.
3. The phrase “after my skin worms destroy this body” in verse 26 refers to the death and decay of Job’s physical body. After that, he said “yet in my flesh I shall see God.” Because of his faith he trusted that no matter what happened to his physical body, he would one day be resurrected and see God. His testimony of the Savior and the Resurrection gave him hope in the midst of his trials.
4. Testimony of the Savior and the Resurrection can give us hope not only when we are confronted with death but also when we experience other challenges. Elder Dallin H. Oaks of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles said:

The assurance of resurrection gives us the strength and perspective to endure the mortal challenges faced by each of us and by those we love, such things as the physical, mental, or emotional deficiencies we bring with us at birth or acquire during mortal life. Because of the resurrection, we know that these mortal deficiencies are only temporary! (“Resurrection,” Ensign, May 2000, 15)

5. Job not only possessed a testimony of the Savior but also desired to write it down, preserve it, and share it with others (see Job 19:23). Recording and preserving our testimonies can help us during future times of trial to remember the comforting and hopeful doctrines we know to be true.

Week 2

Day 1

Primary
1. Read Psalm 1 and Psalm 2.
2. The Psalms are a collection of praises and songs from the ancient Israelites. Studying Psalms can bring us nearer to God and help us feel His love.
3. Listen to the song “I Feel My Savior’s Love.”
4. Listen to the “Books of the Old Testament” song. Be sure you can sing it through Psalms!

Youth
1. Read Psalm 1 and Psalm 2.
2. We don’t know for certain who wrote the Psalms. Some have been attributed to King David, but for most of them, the writers remain anonymous. Yet after reading the Psalms, we may feel as if we know the hearts of the Psalmists, even if we don’t know their names. What we do know is that the Psalms were an important part of worship among the Israelites, and we know that the Savior quoted them often. In the Psalms, we get a window into the soul of God’s ancient people. We see how they felt about God, what they worried about, and how they found peace. As believers today, all over the world, we still use these words in our worship of God. The writers of the Psalms seem to have had a window into our souls and seem to have found a way to express how we feel about God, what we worry about, and how we find peace.
3. Listen to the “Books of the Old Testament” song. Be sure you can sing it through Psalms!

Day 2

Primary
1. Read Psalm 23 and Psalm 24.
2. Psalm 23 is very famous because it talks about Jesus as a shepherd who takes care of us. Psalm 24 may not be quite as famous, but it contains a doctrinal mastery scripture!
3. Psalm 24:3-4 says:

3 Who shall ascend into the hill of the Lord? or who shall stand in his holy place?

4 He that hath clean hands, and a pure heart; who hath not lifted up his soul unto vanity, nor sworn deceitfully.

Here is a song for this verse to listen to!

Youth
1. Read Psalm 23 and Psalm 24.
2. Psalm 23 teaches how the Lord can help us when we experience difficulties. This psalm is widely regarded as one of the most beloved scripture passages in the Bible. Because Psalm 23 is a poem, it contains vivid images and symbols. In what ways are we like sheep in need of a shepherd?
3. Elder Jeffrey R. Holland said:

We need a shepherd because in innocence or ignorance — but on occasion willfully and against counsel — we turn ‘every one to his own way’ and as a result ‘have gone astray’ [Isaiah 53:6]. We wander here and scamper there, inspect this and nibble at that, until at some point we look up and realize we are either lost or about to be destroyed. We realize that we, or others who affect us, have done either something stupid or something wrong — which are so very often the same thing. We realize we desperately need help; we are in trouble and frantically look about for our shepherd, our defender, our savior. (For Times of Trouble, 204)

4. Now let’s turn to Psalm 24. What do you think the phrases “the hill of the Lord” and “his holy place” refer to? (The temple or the Lord’s presence. The temple in Jerusalem was built on top of a hill!) To be worthy to worship in the Lord’s house and to be prepared to dwell in His presence, we must have clean hands and a pure heart. Elder David A. Bednar of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles said:

Let me suggest that hands are made clean through the process of putting off the natural man and by overcoming sin and the evil influences in our lives through the Savior’s Atonement. Hearts are purified as we receive His strengthening power to do good and become better. All of our worthy desires and good works, as necessary as they are, can never produce clean hands and a pure heart. It is the Atonement of Jesus Christ that provides both a cleansing and redeeming power that helps us to overcome sin and a sanctifying and strengthening power that helps us to become better than we ever could by relying only upon our own strength. (“Clean Hands and a Pure Heart,” Ensign or Liahona, Nov. 2007, 82).

5. Psalms 24:3-4 is a doctrinal mastery scripture!

3 Who shall ascend into the hill of the Lord? or who shall stand in his holy place?

4 He that hath clean hands, and a pure heart; who hath not lifted up his soul unto vanity, nor sworn deceitfully.

Here is a song for this verse to listen to!

Day 3

Primary
1. Read Psalm 27 and Psalm 30.
2. Psalm 27 says if the Lord is our light, we should not fear. It also says if we wait on the Lord he will strengthen our hearts. What do you think it means to “wait upon the Lord?”
3. In Psalm 30 it says “weeping may endure for a night, but joy cometh in the morning.” Because of Jesus Christ, the sadness we feel in this life can be replaced with joy!
4. Listen to the song “My Redeemer Lives.”

Youth
1. Read Psalm 27 and Psalm 30.
2. You might recognize the words in Psalm 27, “The Lord is my light and my salvation; whom shall I fear?” These words are reflected in Hymn 89, “The Lord is My Light.” You might notice as you read the Psalms how often the writers express fear, sorrow, or anxiety. Such feelings are normal, even for people of faith. But what makes the Psalms inspiring is the solutions they offer, including complete trust in the Lord.
3. Psalm 30:5 contains the promise that “weeping may endure for a night, but joy cometh in the morning.” How has the Lord turned our sadness into joy?

Day 4

Primary
1. Read Psalm 33 and Psalm 46.
2. Psalm 33 teaches that we can find evidence of the glory and goodness of God all around us in His beautiful creations. If we look, we can learn to see God’s hand in the world around us.
3. Psalm 46:10. says “be still, and know that I am God.” Taking time to be reverent and still, despite the busyness around us, can help us build our testimonies that God lives. What are some times during your day that you can be still and build your testimony?
4. Listen to the song “Teach Me to Walk in the Light.”

Youth
1. Read Psalm 33 and Psalm 46.
2. Part of Psalm 33 is a song praising the Lord for His power and goodness, which are manifest in His creations. Look at Psalm 33:4-9. What does the writer of this psalm want us to do? Why should the people of the earth praise the Lord and sing to Him? What do you think it means that the Lord spiritually delivers our souls from death and famine? How is He spiritually “our help and our shield”? As we respect the Lord and hope in His mercy, He can deliver us from spiritual perils.
3. Read Psalm 46:10. What do you think it means to “be still, and know that I am God?” Taking time to be reverent and still, despite the busyness around us, can help us build our testimonies that God lives.

Week 3

Day 1

Primary
1. Read Psalm 51.
2. Everyone makes mistakes – that is a part of mortal life. We can receive help from Jesus Christ to overcome them.
3. Watch the video “The Shiny Bicycle.”
4. Listen to the song “Teach Me to Walk in the Light.”

Youth
1. Read Psalm 51.
2. David did many great things in his life, but he also sinned deeply. David’s sincere remorse for these sins is recorded in Psalm 51. If we acknowledge our sins and offer the Savior a broken heart and contrite spirit, then He can make us clean. What lessons can we learn about repentance and about the Lord from David’s pleas for forgiveness? As we understand the merciful character of God, we will have confidence to turn to Him to seek forgiveness of our sins and help with our troubles.
3. Elder D. Todd Christofferson of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles taught:

In ancient times when people wanted to worship the Lord and seek His blessings, they often brought a gift. For example, when they went to the temple, they brought a sacrifice to place on the altar. After His Atonement and Resurrection, the Savior said He would no longer accept burnt offerings of animals. The gift or sacrifice He will accept now is ‘a broken heart and a contrite spirit’ [3 Nephi 9:20]. As you seek the blessing of conversion, you can offer the Lord the gift of your broken, or repentant, heart and your contrite, or obedient, spirit. In reality, it is the gift of yourself—what you are and what you are becoming. (“When Thou Art Converted,” Ensign or Liahona, May 2004, 12).

4. Elder Bruce D. Porter of the Seventy teaches about having a broken heart and a contrite spirit.

Those who have a broken heart and a contrite spirit are willing to do anything and everything that God asks of them, without resistance or resentment. We cease doing things our way and learn to do them God’s way instead. In such a condition of submissiveness, the Atonement can take effect and true repentance can occur. (“A Broken Heart and a Contrite Spirit,” Ensign or Liahona, Nov. 2007, 32)

Day 2

Primary
1. Read Psalm 61 and Psalm 66.
2. Psalm 61 describes God as a rock, a shelter, and a strong tower. Read Psalm 66:16. What has the Lord done for your soul?
3. Listen to the song “My Redeemer Lives.”

Youth
1. Read Psalm 61 and Psalm 66.
2. Psalm 61 is like a prayer. David compares the Lord to a rock, a shelter, and a high tower. How can Jesus be a rock and a shelter in our lives?
3. Read Psalm 66:16. What does it mean to tell what God has done for your soul? What are some things that God has done for you?