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Ornithology with Lab, Quarter 2

Welcome to Quarter 2! Do you need to go back to Quarter 1?

Day 46*

1. Read the page about bird flight, continuing down and reading the section about argentavis.
2. Watch the video about the birds’ secret to flying super high.
3. Watch the video about argentavis, the largest known flying bird in history.
4. Print out the second quarter grading sheet and save it for later.

Day 47

1. Albatrosses fly with a technique called dynamic soaring. Read all about it!
2. Watch the video about how albatrosses can fly for so long without using much energy.

Day 48

1. Read the section that begins “Of course, most birds flap their wings…” Continue reading until the video measuring magpie flight energy.
2. Watch the video of a seagull in flight.
3. Watch the video about how birds can fly in strong winds.

Day 49

1. Read about bird flight patterns.
2. Play the video and identify the flight pattern. Click ‘identify another pattern’ and try again until you have identified all five of the flight patterns.

Day 50

1. Read the section that begins “Hummingbirds flying in the rain…” and read two paragraphs.
2. Watch the video “a hummingbird in a rainstorm.”
3. Continue your bird count! (If you are using the paper version and yours is full, you can print another copy of the tally sheet on day 5.) Go outside and count all birds you see or hear for 15 minutes. Try to identify the birds and count how many of each you notice. Save your count sheet (or if you are using the app, be sure you are logged in so your count will be saved.)

Day 51*

1. Watch the video about different strategies birds use to fly together.
2. Print page 1 of the PDF and use the video to answer the questions. Check your answers and record your score out of 6.
3. Watch a flock of starlings fly in a strange formation called a “murmuration.”

Day 52

1. Of course, not all birds fly. Some birds rely entirely on walking, running, or swimming to get around. Birds that regularly travel on the ground often have longer legs. Ratites like ostriches and emus have reduced the number of their toes for more efficient locomotion.
2. Look at a closeup view of an ostrich walking. See its toes?
3.Watch this video of an emu running around his enclosure. Watch his legs!
4. Look at this image of the skeleton of a walking bird (northern lapwing). Observe the differences in the leg bones compared to a flying bird (sparrow).

Day 53

1. Read the paragraph that begins “Waddling makes most of…” The waddling of a penguin may look inefficient, but it uses less energy than human walking!
2. Watch the video about penguin waddling!

Day 54

1. Read the paragraph about avian head bobbing.
2. Watch this video of a kingfisher keeping its head steady while it sits on a swaying reed. How do birds do that?
3. According to the National Audubon Society, birds are less able than humans to stabilize their gaze by making movements with their eyes. Instead, they focus on stabilizing their heads.

By keeping their head steady, birds like the kingfisher don’t have to rely on their eyes alone for image stabilization, says David Dickman, a neuroscience professor at Baylor College of Medicine. “The branch is blowing all over the place, so if the bird’s head wasn’t locked to gravity and stable in space, then they would constantly have to be moving the eyes to maintain [focus].” And depending largely on eye movement to control stabilization, as many vertebrates do, is not advantageous for birds, Lentink says. When birds are in high-intensity motion, their heads become a stable platform. Large movement in the eyes takes away from that stability and thus reduces the accuracy of visual information. “You don’t want to have moving eyes,” he says.

4. Here is a funny commercial about someone using a chicken to stabilize their camera using this characteristic. If you have access to a chicken, you can try moving their body around and watching how they hold their head still.

Day 55

1. Read the three paragraphs about birds adapted for climbing.
2. Watch the video of a treecreeper climbing the bark of a tree.
3. Watch the video of a woodpecker climbing down a tree.
4. Continue your bird count! (If you are using the paper version and yours is full, you can print another copy of the tally sheet on day 5.) Go outside and count all birds you see or hear for 15 minutes. Try to identify the birds and count how many of each you notice. Save your count sheet (or if you are using the app, be sure you are logged in so your count will be saved.)

Day 56

1. The difference between swimming and diving birds
Birds that swim are/have

  • lightweight and buoyant
  • feathers have more barbules and hooklets (less permeable to water)
  • well developed glands that produce secretions to keep feathers in good conditions
  • webbed feet that act like oars

2. Watch the video of the tufted duck, mallard, and swan underwater. You can see that even though they swim underwater, they keep their wings tucked in and propel themselves by paddling their feet alone.
3. Birds that dive are/have

  • heavier and less buoyant
  • feet located further back on the body
  • smaller, muscular wings used for “flying” underwater

4. Watch the video of the puffin swimming. Notice how the feet are tucked back while the wings do the work.
5. Here is another video, of birds called surf scoters. You can see that sometimes they propel themselves mostly with their feet (although their wings are partially extended for steering) and sometimes they propel themselves with their wings.

Day 57

1. Read about the way emperor penguins get out of the water.
2. Watch the video of emperor penguins shooting out of the water onto the ice!
3. Read about why divers have small wings.

Day 58

1. Watch the video about the function of bird feet.
2. This video is talking about the main functions of bird feet. Study these bird feet flash cards. (Make sure you sign into Quizlet, or you will not be able to see all of them!)

Day 59*

1. Watch the video about crafting a “proper” bird foot.
2. Read the section about bird toe arrangements. (STOP when you get to “claws.”)
3. Print page 1 of the PDF and identify the bird toe configurations. Check your answers and record your score out of 5.

Day 60*

1. Read the section about webbing and lobation in the feet of water birds. (Stop at “Thermal Regulation.”)
2. Print page 1 of the PDF and identify the types of water bird feet. Check your answers and record your score out of 4.
3. Watch the video of the coot eating water plants. What type of feet does it have?
4. Continue your bird count! (If you are using the paper version and yours is full, you can print another copy of the tally sheet on day 5.) Go outside and count all birds you see or hear for 15 minutes. Try to identify the birds and count how many of each you notice. Save your count sheet (or if you are using the app, be sure you are logged in so your count will be saved.)

Day 61*

1. We’re going to move on from locomotion and discuss the various sounds that birds make. Read the nine most important things to know about bird song.
2. Print page 1 of the PDF and use the website to answer the questions. Check your answers and record your score out of 8.

Day 62*

1. Visit ‘songbirds in action‘ and click “play the videos.” There are nine different birds to click on, each one with a video of the bird singing. Watch and listen to each one, and read the information next to the video. Some of this will repeat what we learned yesterday, but it’s good to review.
2. Print page 1 of the PDF and use the information you read to answer the questions. Check your answers and record your score out of 6.

Day 63

1. Visit this page again. Click the + on the right hand side and select number 4, “How Birds Sing.” Click ‘Animate the Syrix’ and explore all 4 animations. Don’t miss the button that says ‘play 1/4 speed!’
2. Watch the video about a bird’s vocal apparatus.

Day 64*

1. Watch the video “How Birds Sing.”
2. Print page 1 of the PDF and use the video to answer the questions. Check your answers and record your score out of 7.

Day 65

1. Read the article about the lyrebird and how it mimics so many sounds!
2. Watch the video of David Attenborough and a lyrebird that sounds like a chainsaw!
3. Continue your bird count! (If you are using the paper version and yours is full, you can print another copy of the tally sheet on day 5.) Go outside and count all birds you see or hear for 15 minutes. Try to identify the birds and count how many of each you notice. Save your count sheet (or if you are using the app, be sure you are logged in so your count will be saved.)

Day 66*

1. Only three groups of birds are known to learn their songs: songbirds, hummingbirds, and parrots. Today let’s talk about the interesting vocalizations of parrots! Watch the video “why can parrots talk?”
2. Print page 1 of the PDF and use the video to answer the questions.

Day 67

1. Read the section that begins “Low frequency calls of cassowaries…”.
2. Watch the video of the wild female southern cassowary calling.
3. Listen to more cassowary sounds.

Day 68

1. Watch the video about imitating bird calls and understanding their functions.

Day 69

1. Watch this episode of the “Secret Life of Birds” about the dawn chorus.

Links for Later (Not for you yet)
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