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Come Follow Me – Old Testament (February)

Welcome to February!
Links to other months: January, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October

February, Week 1

Day 1

Primary
1. Read Moses 8.
2. Following the Prophet will bless you and your family. If you can learn to follow the prophet, you will be blessed and kept spiritually safe, just as Noah’s family was kept safe from the Flood.
3. Do you know who our prophet is today? When do you get to hear the direction he has for you?
4. Listen to “Choose to Serve the Lord.”

Youth
1. Read Moses 8.
2. The Lord promised Enoch that Noah would be one of his descendants. Read Moses 8:1-11 and see if you can figure out what relationship Noah had with Enoch.
3. Read Moses 8:17. What does it mean that God will not always strive with man? How much time does it say He is going to give people to repent?
4. All that God does is for the benefit of His children. Some people wonder why a loving God would destroy almost all of the people on earth through the Flood. Elder Neal A. Maxwell of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles explained that God intervened “when corruption had reached an agency-destroying point that spirits could not, in justice, be sent here.” President John Taylor explained that “by taking away their earthly existence [God] prevented them from entailing their sins upon their posterity and degenerating [or corrupting] them, and also prevented them from committing further acts of wickedness.” Why do you think it is important to understand that what God did is for the benefit of His children?

Day 2

Primary
1. Read Genesis 6-7.
2. Watch the video about Noah.
3. Look at this picture of Noah’s ark to get a better idea of how very big it was and who was on board.
4. Listen to the first three verses of “Follow the Prophet.” That is only the first two minutes. These verses talk about Adam, Enoch, and Noah – all prophets we have learned about so far this year.

Youth
1. Read Genesis 6-7.
2. The Lord commanded Noah to build an ark in which his family and “every living thing of all flesh” (Genesis 6:19) were saved from the Flood. Floodwater destroyed the wicked and all creatures that lived on the land except those in the ark. When the floodwater receded, Noah and his family exited the ark. The Lord gave them commandments and established with them the covenant He had made with Enoch.
3. Noah demonstrated faith when he build the ark. “As yet there was no evidence of rain and flood. His people mocked and called him a fool. His preaching fell on deaf ears. His warnings were considered irrational. There was no precedent; never had it been known that a deluge [or flood] could cover the earth. How foolish to build an ark on dry ground with the sun shining and life moving forward as usual!” – Spencer W. Kimball
4. How would Noah be blessed by acting in faith to build the ark when there appeared to be no danger? What are some things the Lord has asked us to do that might appear foolish to others? If we act in faith by obeying the Lord’s commands, we can receive His blessings and protection.

Day 3

Primary
1. Read Genesis 8-9.
2. Gospel covenants can be represented by a sign, symbol, or “token.” For example, think about how the bread and water of the sacrament or the waters of baptism are related to covenants. God promised Noah that he would not flood the earth anymore, and he left a symbol as a reminder of that promise. What was the symbol? (Click here for a hint.)
3. Listen to “He Sent His Son.”

Youth
1. Read Genesis 8-9.
2. After the Flood, the waters on the earth gradually receded and the ark rested upon the mountains of Ararat. Noah sent out birds to determine how far the water level had lowered. When a dove returned with an olive leaf, Noah knew the waters had receded enough. After Noah and his family had been on the ark for about a year, God directed them to exit the ark. Noah offered animal sacrifices to the Lord, gave thanks, and asked the Lord to “not again curse the ground any more for man’s sake.” The Lord commanded Noah and his family to multiply and replenish the earth, instructed them on how to treat living things, and commanded them not to shed man’s blood (murder).
3. In Genesis 9:8-11, God formed a covenant with Noah and his sons. He lays out a token, or symbol, of that covenant in verses 12-17. What was the token of this covenant? (Click here for a hint.) God uses tokens as reminders of covenants. The rainbow became a symbol and reminder of God’s mercy to His children on earth.
4. There was more to the covenant God made with Noah than promising not to flood the earth again. The Joseph Smith Translation helps us understand that God was renewing the same covenant He made with Enoch. This covenant was that when Noah’s posterity obeyed all of God’s commandments, the heavens and earth would rejoice and Enoch’s city of Zion would again come upon the earth.

Day 4

Primary
1. Read Genesis 11.
2. Watch the video about the Tower of Babel.
3. What does Helaman 3:28 say about the right way to reach heaven?
4. The people of Babel thought they could reach heaven by building a tower rather than by living the gospel of Jesus Christ. While people today might not try to build towers in order to reach heaven, many try to find peace and happiness by following paths other than the one Jesus Christ has established.
5. Listen to “Choose the Right.”

Youth
1. Read Genesis 11.
2. The ‘slime’ in verse 3 was a substance like asphalt or tar that was used not only as an adhesive for the bricks but also to seal objects against water or moisture. Why might the people have wanted to use a substance for mortar that would resist water? (Some people think that the people used slime as mortar to make the tower waterproof so it would keep them safe in their sins if God decided to flood the earth again.)
3. What did the Lord do to the inhabitants of earth? He confused their languages and scattered them across the earth. Because they could not communicate and scattered across the land, they could not continue building the tower.
4. In addition to providing an explanation for the numerous languages now found on the earth, the account of the Tower of Babel shows how quickly (in less than 150 years) the people forgot the lessons of the Flood and turned again from the Lord. The Book of Mormon illustrates how the actual confounding of the languages may not have occurred instantaneously but may have happened over an unknown length of time. Jared asked his brother to call upon the Lord and request that their language not be confounded. This request was granted. Then Jared asked his brother to plead that the language of their friends would stay the same as theirs. This request was also granted. These events imply that the confounding of the languages did not happen in an instant.

February, Week 2

Day 1

Primary
1. Read Abraham 1.
2. Abraham was living in a place where people had turned to wickedness and were making human sacrifices. In verse 11 we read about three young women who were sacrificed because they would not bow down to stone or wooden idols. Abraham’s father sent him to be sacrificed, too, but he prayed to Heavenly Father and he was rescued.
3. Watch the video “The Deliverance of Abraham.”

Youth
1. Read Abraham 1.
2. Like many of us, Abraham lived in a wicked environment, yet he desired to be righteous. President Dallin H. Oaks taught the importance of having righteous desires: “As important as it is to lose every desire for sin, eternal life requires more. To achieve our eternal destiny, we will desire and work for the qualities required to become an eternal being. … If this seems too difficult — and surely it is not easy for any of us — then we should begin with a desire for such qualities and call upon our loving Heavenly Father for help with our feelings.”
3. Unlike us, Abraham lived in an area where people were practicing human sacrifice. In verse 11 we read about three virtuous young women who were sacrificed because they refused to bow down to idols. Abraham was going to be sacrificed as well, but he cried unto the Lord and was rescued.
4. Watch the video “The Deliverance of Abraham.”

Day 2

*Primary
1. Read Abraham 2 and Genesis 12.
2. Look at Abraham 2:6, 9-11. Find the promises that the Lord gives Abraham. See if you can find the responsibilities he is given. Abraham was promised so many descendants that it would be easier to count the grains of sand on a beach or the stars in the sky than his posterity. (At this point, Abraham and Sarai did not have any children.) It is important to note that not just his descendants, but anyone who receives the Gospel is counted as belonging to the family of Abraham.
3. Watch the video “Abraham and Sarah.”
*4. Print the PDF. Cut out the blessings and responsibilities of the Abrahamic covenant and glue them in the correct columns.

*Youth
1. Read Abraham 2 and Genesis 12.
2. Look at Abraham 2:6, 9-11. Find the promises that the Lord gives Abraham. See if you can find the responsibilities he is given. Abraham was promised so many descendants that it would be easier to count the grains of sand on a beach or the stars in the sky than his posterity. (At this point, Abraham and Sarai did not have any children.) It is important to note that not just his descendants, but anyone who receives the Gospel is counted as belonging to the family of Abraham.
3. During the famine in Ur, Abraham and Sarai went to Egypt, but before they entered the Lord warned Abraham that the Egyptians would kill him so they could take his wife because she was beautiful. He was told to tell the Egyptians she was his sister instead of his wife, and they wouldn’t kill him. The plan worked, and Sarai was taken into Pharaoh’s house. The Lord sent a plague to Pharaoh’s house and the Pharaoh realized Sarai was being protected and sent Abraham and his wife away.
*4. Print page 1 of the PDF. Write the responsibilities and blessings of the Abrahamic covenant in the correct columns. (There are some ideas on page 2.)

Day 3

Primary
1. Read Genesis 13 and 14.
2. In the Old Testament, sometimes people changed their names through their lives. Abram is another name that Abraham used, so when it says Abram we’re still talking about Abraham. Abram and Lot left Egypt and settled together in the land of Canaan. There wasn’t enough land to support both Abram and Lot’s cattle. Abram didn’t want to fight with Lot and so he told him to choose where to live. Even though Lot took the most fertile land in Jordan with the best grass and water, Abram still didn’t fight with him. He decided it was more important to be a peacemaker than to take the best place, so he left with everything he had and settled in the land of Canaan.
3. Lot pitched his tent close to the city of Sodom. Today, Sodom is remembered as a very, very wicked city. The people of Sodom were at war with neighboring kingdoms, and they captured Lot and all of his people. One of Lot’s people escaped and reached Abram to tell him about Lot’s capture. Abram armed hundreds of his servants and chased them, and in the night time they attacked, rescuing Lot, his people, and his wealth. After this rescue, Abram was met by two of the kings. One king, the righteous king Melchizedek (sound familiar?), offered him a blessing, which Abram accepted. The wicked king of Sodom, on the other hand, attempted to strike a bargain. If Abram would return Lot and all his people to the king of Sodom, he would allow Abram to keep all of Lot’s wealth, making him even richer. Abram refused to take this bargain. Why do you think Abram accepted something from one king but not the other? What would you have done if you were Abram?
4. Listen to “Choose to Serve the Lord.”

Youth
1. Read Genesis 13 and 14.
2. Abram and Lot left Egypt with all their flocks and possessions and journeyed back to the land of Canaan, where they settled together. However, there was a problem. (What was the problem?) How did Abram choose to solve the problem? Why didn’t he insist that he get to have the better land?
3. Abram decided to be a peacemaker in his family. Being a peacemaker may require us to place others’ interests above our own.
4. Lot pitched his tent close to the city of Sodom. Today, Sodom is remembered as a very, very wicked city. The people of Sodom were at war with neighboring kingdoms, and they captured Lot and all of his people. One of Lot’s people escaped and reached Abram to tell him about Lot’s capture. Abram armed hundreds of his servants and chased them, and in the night time they attacked, rescuing Lot, his people, and his wealth. After this rescue, Abram was met by two of the kings. One king, the righteous king Melchizedek (sound familiar?), offered him a blessing, which Abram accepted. The wicked king of Sodom, on the other hand, attempted to strike a bargain. If Abram would return Lot and all his people to the king of Sodom, he would allow Abram to keep all of Lot’s wealth, making him even richer. Abram refused to take this bargain. Why do you think Abram accepted something from one king but not the other? What would you have done if you were Abram?

Day 4

Primary
1. Read Genesis 15 and 16.
2. Sometimes in the past, some men married more than one wife. Sarah decided to have her servant Hagar marry Abraham, because she thought then he could have children and his covenant promises could come to pass.
3. Watch the video about Hagar.
4. Listen to “Choose the Right.”

Youth
1. Read Genesis 15 and 16.
2. As Abram grew older, he was concerned about how God would fulfill the promises He had made regarding Abram’s posterity. Abram conversed with the Lord in a vision, in which the Lord comforted him, reassuring him that all of the promises would be fulfilled. When we believe that the Lord will fulfill His promises to us, whether in mortality or eternity, our souls can find peace.
3. At certain times in the history of the world, the Lord has commanded His people to practice plural marriage. Plural marriage was practiced by Abram and Sarai and by their grandson Jacob, and it was practiced for a time during the early days of the restored Church, beginning with Joseph Smith. Sarai hoped that by giving her handmaid Hagar to Abram as a wife, that Abram would be able to have children and his covenant with the Lord would be fulfilled. However, when Hagar became pregnant, there were hard feelings between her and Sarai, and Hagar fled into the wilderness. In the wilderness, an angel visited her. Look at Genesis 16:7-11 to see what the angel told her.

February, Week 3

Day 1

Primary
1. Read Genesis 18 and Genesis 19:1-26.
2. Three holy messengers came to visit Abraham and Sarah, and repeated the promise that Sarah would have a son. They also told Abraham that God was going to destroy the cities of Sodom and Gomorrah because of the terrible wickedness of the people who lived there. After they left, Abraham was very worried. He prayed, and asked the Lord if he would spare the city if fifty righteous people lived there. Abraham asked for mercy on the people of Sodom, eventually getting a promise that if even ten righteous people were found there, God would spare the city from destruction.
3.The messengers who visited Abraham came to see Lot. For some reason, Lot was living in Sodom with his wife and daughters. I don’t know about you, but I wouldn’t want to live in the same city whose wicked king I was captured by, a city full of wicked people! That seems like it might have been a bad decision on Lot’s part. The angels warned Lot that the city was going to be destroyed.
4. When Lot didn’t leave fast enough, the messengers grabbed Lot, his wife, and his daughters by the hand and dragged them out of the city. They warned Lot and his family not to look back, and told them to run. What happened to Lot’s wife? (Genesis 19:24-26) Probably, Lot’s wife didn’t just look behind her, but instead wanted in her heart to go back to wicked Sodom, and possibly even went back, where she would have been destroyed with everyone else.
5. Listen to “Choose to Serve the Lord.”

Youth
1. Read Genesis 18 and Genesis 19:1-26.
2. Three holy messengers came to visit Abraham and Sarah, and repeated the promise that Sarah would have a son. They also told Abraham that God was going to destroy the cities of Sodom and Gomorrah because of the terrible wickedness of the people who lived there.
3. Said President Spencer W. Kimball: “Abraham knew that the cities of the plains – Sodom and Gomorrah and other places – were wicked cities, housing wicked, godless people. . . He was aware that destruction of those cities was imminent; but in his compassion for his fellowman, he begged and pleaded with the Lord, ‘Peradventure there be fifty righteous within the city,’ will you spare the others of the city? That pleading being granted, came Abraham again and prayed that the cities would be saved if 45 were found, or 40 or 30 or 20 or down to ten, but apparently there could not be found even ten, in those vicious cities, who were righteous.”
4. What lessons do you learn about fleeing wickedness as you read about Lot and his family? For example, what impresses you about what the angels said and did to help Lot and his family escape destruction? (Genesis 19:12-17) How does the Lord help you and your family flee or find protection from evil influences in the world?
5. What happened to Lot’s wife? (Genesis 19:24-26) Why do you think that happened?
6. Elder Jeffrey R. Holland taught, “Apparently, what was wrong with Lot’s wife was that she wasn’t just looking back; in her heart she wanted to go back. It would appear that even before she was past the city limits, she was already missing what Sodom and Gomorrah had offered her. … She did not have faith. She doubted the Lord’s ability to give her something better than she already had.”

Day 2

Primary
1. Read Genesis 21.
2. The Lord promised Abraham and Sarah that they would have a son, but Abraham was 100 and Sarah was 90 years old. They might have thought there was no way that this promise could be fulfilled. Read Genesis 21:1-7. What happened? Can we trust the Lord to keep His promises?
3. Listen to the first four verses of “Follow the Prophet.” That is only the first two minutes and forty seconds. These verses talk about Adam, Enoch, Noah, and now Abraham!

Youth
1. Read Genesis 21.
2. The Lord has made glorious promises to the faithful, but sometimes the circumstances of our lives can cause us to wonder how those promises can possibly be fulfilled. Abraham and Sarah may have felt that way at times – after all, Abraham was almost 100 years old and Sarah was almost 90 years old when the Lord promised that Sarah would have a child.
3. Read Genesis 21:1-7. How were the promises the Lord made to them fulfilled?
4. Sarah saw Hagar’s son Ishmael mocking, or persecuting, Isaac. Sarah told Abraham to send Hagar and Ishmael away into the wilderness, which grieved Abraham. While there are details of this story we do not possess, we do know that Sarah was a remarkable woman. However, she also possessed feelings and emotions like any human being and was protective of her covenant son, Isaac.
5. What did the Lord promise Abraham about Ishmael? (Genesis 21:12-13)
6. Ishmael eventually became the principal ancestor of much of the Arab world in fulfillment of the promise made to Abraham. How do you think this account illustrates the principle that God always keeps His promises?

*Day 3

*Primary
1. Read Genesis 22.
2. Watch the video about Abraham and Isaac.
3. Print a copy of the activity page for today. Try and match ways that Abraham’s willingness to sacrifice Isaac was like Heavenly Father’s sacrifice of Jesus Christ.
4. Listen to “He Sent His Son.”

*Youth
1. Read Genesis 22.
2. We don’t know all the reasons God commanded Abraham to offer Isaac as a sacrifice; we do know it was a test of his faith in God. Abraham’s willingness to sacrifice his son was “a similitude of God and his Only Begotten Son.”
3. Watch the video about Abraham offering Isaac as a sacrifice.
4. Print a copy of the activity page for today. Try and match ways that Abraham’s willingness to sacrifice Isaac was like Heavenly Father’s sacrifice of Jesus Christ.

Day 4

Primary
1. Read Genesis 23.
2. Today is a music day! Listen to these songs.

Youth
1. Read Genesis 23.
2. Let’s think more about Abraham’s sacrifice of Isaac. It can be difficult to understand why the Lord would command Abraham to do something so challenging as sacrificing his son. President George Q. Cannon of the First Presidency said:

“Why did the Lord ask such things of Abraham? Because, knowing what his future would be and that he would be the father of an innumerable posterity, he was determined to test him. God did not do this for His own sake for He knew by His foreknowledge what Abraham would do; but the purpose was to impress upon Abraham a lesson and to enable him to attain unto knowledge that he could not obtain in any other way. That is why God tries all of us. It is not for His own knowledge for He knows all things beforehand. He knows all your lives and everything you will do. But He tries us for our own good that we may know ourselves.”

3.The Lectures on Faith state:

“Let us here observe, that a religion that does not require the sacrifice of all things never has power sufficient to produce the faith necessary unto life and salvation. … It was through this sacrifice, and this only, that God has ordained that men should enjoy eternal life; and it is through the medium of the sacrifice of all earthly things that men do actually know that they are doing the things that are well pleasing in the sight of God.”

4. Brigham Young University Professor Truman G. Madsen wrote about a time when he stood with President Hugh B. Brown of the First Presidency in Hebron, near the tomb of Abraham:

“I [asked President Brown], ‘Why … was Abraham commanded to go to Mount Moriah and offer his only hope of posterity?’

“It was clear that this man, nearly ninety, had thought and prayed and wept over that question before. He finally said, ‘Abraham needed to learn something about Abraham.'”

5. What is something you have been asked to sacrifice to the Lord in your life?

February, Week 4

Day 1

*Primary
1. Read Genesis 24.
2. Abraham was old, and he wanted to help Isaac find a righteous wife before he died. Abraham’s servant showed faith by trusting God’s guidance to find a wife for Isaac. The servant did not know how to find a good wife for Isaac, and so he came up with a plan and prayed about it. He would wait by the well and ask the women that came down for a drink of water. If a woman agreed to give him a drink and then also volunteered to get water for his camels without being asked, he would know he had found the right woman.
3. Almost before the servant was done praying, a woman came out to get water from the well. The servant asked for a drink, and she gave him a drink, then said she would get enough water for all ten of his camels to drink as much as they wanted. A thirsty camel can drink a bathtub full of water each! What kind of person would do that much work without being asked?
4. Print out the activity sheet and find the righteous characteristics that made Rebekah a good choice for a wife.
5. Listen to “Choose to Serve the Lord.”

Youth
1. Read Genesis 24.
2. Today many people make marriage a low priority or even consider it a burden. Abraham had a different perspective – to him, the marriage of his son Isaac was of highest importance. Why do you think it was so important to him? President Russell M. Nelson said,

“A couple in love can choose a marriage of the highest quality or a lesser type that will not endure. Or they can choose neither. … The best choice is a celestial marriage.”

3. Who did Abraham NOT want Isaac to marry? (Genesis 24:1-3) Why do you think that is?
4. Because the Canaanites did not believe in the Lord, no Canaanite woman would have been prepared to receive the responsibilities and blessings of the Abrahamic covenant and eternal marriage. The decision Isaac faced concerning whether or not to marry in the covenant is just like our choice today of whether to receive the marriage sealing ordinance in the temple.
5. The journey from Abraham’s location in the land of Canaan to Mesopotamia where his relatives lived was a distance of approximately 1,200 miles round-trip. It took a lot of time, money, and effort to go find a righteous wife for Isaac.
6. What characteristics did Rebekah have that would make her a a good wife?

Day 2

Primary
1. Read Genesis 25.
2. Because Esau was the oldest child in his family, he was supposed to get special responsibilities and privileges, called a birthright. One day when Esau was hungry, he traded his birthright to his brother, Jacob, for some food. Esau chose to trade something of great value, his birthright, for something of lesser value, some bread and a bowl of soup.
3. Sometimes we have to choose between things that are of great spiritual worth (going to church, keeping the commandments, attending the temple) and things that only give us temporary happiness (food, games, toys, watching tv). Is it hard sometimes to remember what is more important when we are “hungry” for physical things, like Esau was?
4. Watch the video about Jacob and Esau.
5. Listen to “Choose the Right.”

Youth
1. Read Genesis 25.
2. Isaac and his wife Rebekah wanted to have children, but she was barren. (That means she could not get pregnant.) Isaac prayed to the Lord, they were blessed, and Rebekah became pregnant. While she was pregnant, she felt ‘a struggle within her womb’ (fighting in her stomach) and prayed to know what was going on. Read Genesis 25:23 to see what she was told.
3. Read Genesis 25:24-28. Jacob and Esau were fraternal twins, with different appearances, personalities, and skills. See what it says about why Isaac loved Esau and Rebekah loved Jacob.
4. In Abraham’s culture, the oldest son in a family typically received a position of leadership and privilege, called the birthright. This son received a greater inheritance from his parents, along with greater responsibilities for caring for the rest of the family.
5. Pottage is kind of like soup. If Esau was really going to die from hunger, do you think his brother would have given him food without a price? Esau’s birthright included all the blessings of the covenant that Abraham made, to be a great nation with many descendants, to have a special relationship with God. Do you think selling that for some soup was a good idea? He must not have thought it was very important! Esau betrayed his birthright in other ways, like marrying Hittite women (women who did not have the Gospel covenants). He was not willing to do the hard work to find someone he could have an eternal marriage with.
6. Elder Richard G. Scott said,

Think of the long view of life, not just what’s going to happen today or tomorrow. Don’t give up what you most want in life for something you think you want now.

How can this quote help you make decisions in your day to day life?

Day 3

Primary
1. Read Genesis 26.
2. The covenant that God made with Abraham was supposed to continue through many generations, so it would need to be passed down to Isaac, then his son Jacob, and his sons. In this chapter we see that the Lord repeats his promises to Isaac.
3. Listen to “He Sent His Son.”

Youth
1. Read Genesis 26.
2. The covenant God made with Abraham was intended to continue through many generations, so Abraham and Sarah’s legacy of covenant keeping would need to be passed down to Isaac, Jacob, and other faithful women and men among their posterity. What are some of the blessings of the covenant that the Lord promised to Isaac? (Genesis 26:1-5)
3. You may notice that wells and springs and other water sources play important roles in many Old Testament stories. This isn’t surprising, because most of these stories happened in very dry places. As you read in Genesis 26:18-25, 32-33 about Isaac’s wells, ponder what water may symbolize in the scriptures.
4. Read John 4:10-15. What insights do you find about spiritual wells of “living water”? How are you digging spiritual wells in your life? How is the Savior like living water to you? Note that the Philistines had “stopped” the wells. Is there anything in your life that is stopping your wells of living water?

Day 4

Primary
1. Read Genesis 27.
2. When Isaac was old, he prepared to give Esau the birthright blessing, but Rebekah had a plan to help Isaac get it. Isaac was worried that tricking his father for the blessing was a sin, but Rebekah had received revelation and she knew that the blessing should go to Isaac. What was Rebekah’s plan? Did it work? How did Esau feel when he came back from hunting?
4. Watch the video about Jacob and Esau.
5. Listen to the first four verses of “Follow the Prophet.” That is only the first two minutes and forty seconds. These are the verses about Adam, Enoch, Noah, and now Abraham/Isaac/Jacob!

Youth
1. Read Genesis 27.
2. Although Esau had sold his birthright to Jacob, their father, Isaac, still had the responsibility to bestow the birthright blessing on one of his sons. Isaac intended to give the birthright blessing to Esau. However, Rebekah had previously learned by revelation that Jacob was to receive the birthright. (Genesis 25:23) Rebekah instructed Jacob to approach Isaac, who was physically blind, and present himself as though he were Esau so that Jacob could receive the birthright blessing. Jacob reluctantly carried out this plan and received the blessing.
3. After Isaac learned that he had unknowingly bestowed the birthright blessing on Jacob, he could have revoked the blessing and cursed Jacob. However, instead of revoking the birthright blessings from Jacob and bestowing them upon Esau, Isaac confirmed that the birthright blessing was given to the person the Lord intended to have it. (Genesis 27:33) Because the Spirit of the Lord was directing him, Isaac knew that he had given the blessing to the right son.

Go forward to March!