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Come, Follow Me – Old Testament (June)

Welcome to June!
Links for other months: January, February, March, April, May, July

June, Week 1

Day 1

Primary
1. Read Judges 4.
2. The Israelites did not keep the commandments of the Lord. Instead of killing or driving away the people in the promised land, they let them still live there. Because of this the people of Israel were tempted to worship other gods.
3. Although many of the Israelites fell away from the Lord, some remained true to Him and were able to help many others return to righteousness. During a time when the Israelites had been wicked, a righteous woman named Deborah and the commander of the Israelites’ army, Barak, delivered Israel from their enemies.
4. Watch the video about Deborah the Prophetess!
5. Listen to the “Books of the Old Testament” song. Be sure you can sing it through Judges!

Youth
1. Read Judges 2 and Judges 4.
2. After Joshua died, the tribes of Israel continued their conquest of Canaan. Some of the tribes failed to drive out all of the inhabitants of the land of Canaan as they had been commanded. The Israelites forsook the Lord by worshipping the false gods of the Canaanites, and the Lord removed His blessing of protection from them. The book of Judges can serve as a warning to us: even after we experience the Lord’s power in our lives, it is always possible to fall away. The book can also provide encouragement to those who do fall away, for the Lord offers a way back. Despite the Israelites’ disobedience, the Lord raised up judges to deliver them from their enemies. Unfortunately for the Israelites, you will find the pattern of rebelliousness, sorrow, and deliverance repeated throughout the book of Judges.
3. In Judges 4, we read that the Lord called a woman named Deborah to judge Israel. Together, she and the military leader Barak delivered Israel from the Canaanites. Judges 4 highlights Deborah’s strong faith in the Lord Jesus Christ. When Barak insisted that Deborah accompany the military to battle, she agreed to go but gave full credit to the Lord for any success they would have and sought no honor for herself (see Judges 4:8–9).
4. Listen to the “Books of the Old Testament” song. Be sure you can sing it through Judges!

Day 2

Primary
1. Read Judges 7.
2. The Israelites had once again forgotten the Lord, and so they were allowed to be in bondage to the Midianites. When the people remembered to pray to the Lord, they Lord called a man named Gideon to deliver the Israelites. He wanted the Israelites to know they had been rescued by a miracle, and not by their own strength, and so he told Gideon to send most of the army home. Finally, Gideon defeated the huge Midianite army with only 300 men. He did this by following the Lord’s directions.
3. Watch the video about the army of Gideon.
4. Listen to the song “I Will Be Valiant.”

Youth
1. Read Judges 6 and Judges 7.
2. Israel enjoyed a period of relative peace for 40 years but eventually again did evil in the sight of the Lord. Because of the Israelites’ disobedience, the Lord allowed them to be oppressed by the Midianites. When the Israelites remembered the Lord again, and prayed to be delivered, He called a leader, Gideon, to defeat the Midianites.
3. Before he could assemble an army to go against the Midianites, Gideon was commanded to destroy the altar to the false god, Baal, that the Israelites had built. Why do you think this was the first thing he was commanded to do? (If we desire to have the Lord’s help and strength, we must remove spiritually unclean and evil practices from our lives.)
4. How big was the Midianite army? (Judges 7:12) Gideon originally assembled 32,000 men to fight them, but the Lord commanded him to reduce this number. (Why? Read Judges 7:2). How many men did he eventually reduce the army to? (Judges 7:4-8) If you were Gideon, how would you have felt about having your army reduced from 32,000 to 300?
5. How did Gideon and his 300 men defeat the Midianites? (Judges 7:19-23) In the confusion they created, the Midianites turned and attacked each other in their camp, thinking that they were being attacked. Because Gideon had faith and obeyed the Lord’s commandments, he was able to deliver Israel.

Day 3

Primary
1. Read Judges 13.
2. The Israelites were in bondage again, this time to the Philistines. An angel came to the wife of a man named Manoah and told her she would have a son who would deliver the people of Israel from bondage. This son was to make special covenants with the Lord from birth (this is what they mean when they say he was a Nazarite). He would not be allowed to drink wine, eat unclean things, or cut his hair. When the baby was born, they named him Samson. We will learn more about Samson tomorrow.
3. Listen to the song “A Child’s Prayer.”

Youth
1. Read Judges 13 and Judges 14.
2. Once again, the Israelites did wickedly and were delivered into bondage, this time to the Philistines. The Lord promised to send someone to free them. (Judges 13:2-5) This baby (Samson) was to be raised as a Nazarite from birth, or someone who takes a special covenant with God. During the period of their vow, Nazarites promised not to drink wine, touch any dead thing, or cut their hair.
3. In Judges 14, Samson married a woman of the Philistines, which does not seem like he is making a great start. On the way to marry her, there was an incident which shows what gift Samson was given because of his covenants. (Judges 14:5-6) Killing a lion with his bare hands shows the great physical strength that Samson was given.
4. When Samson returned from Timnath, he found that bees had formed a hive within the carcass of the lion he had killed. Samson used this experience to create a riddle to challenge the Philistines. When the Philistines could not discover the answer to the riddle, they threatened Samson’s wife and convinced her to obtain the answer from Samson. This led to a series of conflicts between Samson and the Philistines.
5. Samson, it seems, was motivated by anger. (Judges 14:19). We will read more about Samson tomorrow.

Day 4

Primary
1. Read Judges 15:10-16 and Judges 16:4-20.
2. Samson had great strength from the Lord and was able to defeat a thousand Philistines alone. The Philistines wanted to know where Samson got his strength, so they paid a woman named Delilah to get the secret from him. Samson lied to her three times and each time escaped the trap. Finally he told her the truth, that he had strength because of the covenant he had made with God, represented by never cutting his hair. Delilah cut his hair while he was sleeping, and then the strength of the Lord left him and he was captured at last. What can we learn from the story of Samson and Delilah?
3. Listen to the song “I’m Trying to Be Like Jesus.”

Youth
1. Read Judges 15 and Judges 16.
2. The pattern of conflict and revenge between Samson and the Philistines continued. The Philistines decided to bribe a Philistine woman named Delilah to discover the source of Samson’s physical strength. They hoped to use this information to defeat Samson. On three different occasions, Delilah tried to persuade Samson to reveal his source of strength, but each time he lied to her and he escaped the traps that were set for him. (I would get suspicious at some point, wouldn’t you?) Finally he told Delilah the truth, and she cut his hair. According to Judges 16:20, why did Samson lose his strength?
3. Samson’s hair was not the source of his strength. Rather, it was the symbol of his covenant relationship with God, who was the source of Samson’s strength. In what ways had Samson broken his covenants with the Lord? When the Lord withdrew His Spirit from Samson, Samson lost his gift of physical strength. What blessings or abilities might we lose when the Lord’s Spirit is not with us?
4. The Philistines captured Samson, put out his eyes, and made him a slave. In time, they held a celebration claiming that their god had delivered Samson into their hands. During the celebration, Samson asked a boy to lead him to the pillars of the building so that he could lean on them. Samson prayed to the Lord for strength, but what was his motive? (Judges 16:28-30) Although Samson killed many Philistines, he did not help the Israelites turn to the Lord and forsake their sins, which was necessary for them to be truly delivered from their enemies. After Samson’s death, the Israelites continued to sin against the Lord and suffer afflictions from their enemies. The Lord had called Samson to dedicate his life to Him so the Lord could deliver the Israelites from the Philistines. How well do you think Samson accomplished the Lord’s will in his life?

Week 2

Day 1

Primary
1. Read Ruth 1 and Ruth 2.
2. When Ruth’s husband died, she could have stayed in her home country, but she chose to go with her widowed mother-in-law, Naomi, and care for her. Ruth made sacrifices to be faithful to the Lord and remain loyal to Naomi.
3. Watch the video about Ruth and Naomi.
4. Listen to the “Books of the Old Testament” song. Be sure you can sing it through Ruth!

Youth
1. Read Ruth 1 and Ruth 2.
2. When Ruth’s husband died, the tragedy had consequences for her that were even more severe than a widow today might face. In Israelite culture at that time, a woman without a husband or sons had no right to property and practically no way to earn a living. As you read Ruth’s story, notice how the Lord turned tragedy into great blessings.
3. President Thomas S. Monson said:

A model of ideal womanhood is Ruth. Sensing the grief-stricken heart of her mother-in-law Naomi – who suffered the loss of each of her two fine sons – feeling perhaps the pangs of despair and loneliness that plagued the very soul of Naomi, Ruth uttered what has become that classic statement of loyalty: ‘Entreat me not to leave thee, or to return from following after thee: for whither thou goest, I will go; and where thou lodgest, I will lodge: thy people shall be my people, and thy God my God.’ [Ruth 1:16.] Ruth’s actions demonstrated the sincerity of her words.
Through Ruth’s undeviating loyalty to Naomi, she was to marry Boaz, by which she — the foreigner and Moabite convert — became a great-grandmother of David and, therefore, an ancestor of our Savior Jesus Christ.

4. The law of Moses instructed those who owned fields not to harvest the crops in the edges of their fields. The law allowed the poor to harvest these crops, ensuring that they would have something to eat. After the harvest was gathered in, the poor were also allowed to go into the field and glean the crops that had been missed by the harvesters. What did Boaz do when he saw Ruth gleaning in his field? (Ruth 2:5-10) Boaz showed additional kindness to Ruth by inviting her to eat with him and the reapers, the people he hired to harvest his fields. Boaz also told the reapers to leave extra portions of grain for Ruth to harvest. Ruth returned to Naomi and told her what had happened. Together they rejoiced in the Lord’s blessings and kindness to them.
5. When we show love and kindness to others, we invite the Lord’s blessings into our lives, and if we choose to trust in the Lord, then He will reward us for our faith.
6. Listen to the “Books of the Old Testament” song. Be sure you can sing it through Ruth!

Day 2

Primary
1. Read Ruth 3 and Ruth 4:1-13.
2. According to Israelite custom, the relatives of a dead man were supposed to marry his widow and take care of her. Naomi told Ruth that she should marry Boaz, because he was a relative and also very kind. Boaz said he would marry Ruth, but first he had to ask another man, who was more closely related to Ruth’s husband. That man did not want to take care of Ruth and Naomi, and so Ruth married Boaz and had a son.
3. Watch the video, “Ruth and Naomi.”
4. Listen to the song “I’m Trying to Be Like Jesus.”

Youth
1. Read Ruth 3 and Ruth 4:1-13.
2. Under the customs and cultural laws of the Israelites, if a husband died childless, it was the duty of the husband’s brother or nearest male relative to marry the widow and raise up children to the dead man’s name. Because of his kindness to her, Naomi suggested that Ruth should marry Boaz. Following Naomi’s direction, Ruth went in to Boaz and asked for his protection as a husband. Boaz replied by saying that he could not immediately marry her, because there was a male relative that was closer than he was. (Ruth 3:12-13) Boaz promised that if the other kinsman declined, he would marry her himself, and then sent her home to Naomi with a gift of grain.
3. Boaz met the nearest kinsman at the gate of the city, where legal agreements were made. He employed 10 elders of the city as witnesses. Boaz knew that according to the custom and marriage rules of their day, the nearest male relative of a deceased man could marry his widow and receive all of his property. According to Ruth 4:4, did he at first want to inherit the property? Read Ruth 4:5-6 to see what made him change his mind.
4. The writer of the book of Ruth has not even preserved the name of that kinsman who was willing to redeem the property but not to marry the widow and raise up a son to the name of the dead. The heir of the dead man would get the redeemed property, and thus it would not increase the redeemer’s estate. That is why he said selfishly, ‘I cannot redeem it, lest I mar mine own inheritance.’ Boaz, on the other hand, was willing to take the unselfish step of marrying Ruth and ensuring her safety and well-being as well as Naomi’s. In this and other ways, Boaz is a type of the Savior, who redeemed all of mankind without thought for His own benefit.
5. One of the prominent themes of the account of Ruth is that of redemption, which relates to all of us. Ruth was a foreigner and a poor and childless widow, which left her in complete poverty with no source of support. Nevertheless, Ruth faithfully accepted the gospel and joined the Lord’s covenant people. Though she could not deliver herself from her destitute condition, she was ultimately “redeemed” by her kinsman Boaz. Because of Ruth’s faith-driven actions and the kindness of her redeemer, Ruth married again, received an inheritance, and was blessed with children. Like Ruth, we cannot save ourselves but must rely on a Redeemer from Bethlehem, one who is able to lift us from our fallen state and secure our happiness as part of His family. Given this theme of redemption, it is interesting to note that Jesus Christ, the Redeemer of Israel and of all mankind, was one of Ruth’s descendants.

Day 3

Primary
1. Read 1 Samuel 1 and 1 Samuel 2:18-26.
2. When Hannah was sad because she could not have children, she turned to the Lord in faith and He answered her prayer. When she received her son, Hannah remembered the promise she had made the Lord and took Samuel to the temple to serve as soon as he was old enough to go. Because she had faith and kept the covenant she had made, Hannah was blessed with more children.
3. Watch the video about Hannah.
4. Listen to the song “A Child’s Prayer.”
5. We’ve moved on to another book! Listen to the “Books of the Old Testament” song. Be sure you can sing it through 1 Samuel.

Youth
1. Read 1 Samuel 1 and 1 Samuel 2:11-36.
2. While worshipping at the tabernacle, Hannah wept and prayed to the Lord for a child. She covenanted with the Lord that if she were given a son, she would give him to the Lord. After witnessing Hannah’s sorrow and grief, and finding out its cause, Eli, the high priest, revealed to Hannah that God would grant her desire. Because of Hannah’s great faith, she was blessed with a son, whom she named Samuel. To keep the promise she made to the Lord, Hannah brought Samuel to Eli to serve the Lord.
3. Eli had two sons, Hophni and Phinehas. These two sons brought disrespect to the tabernacle. Eli’s sons sinned by taking meat from the animal sacrifices that did not belong to them. By doing so, they were essentially robbing God of offerings and cheating the people. Because Eli did not carry out the punishment that the law of Moses required for his sons’ actions, he was failing to do his duty. A “man of God” came to Eli and pronounced the Lord’s curse upon Eli and his house. Eli’s household would be destroyed, and his posterity would not live to old age. His sons would die on the same day, and the Lord would give the priests’ duties of the tabernacle to a more faithful man. Eli lost his right to preside and his blessings of posterity because he did not respect God enough to punish his unrepentant sons for their sins.
4. Watch the video “Hannah’s Faith.”
5. We’ve moved on to another book! Listen to the “Books of the Old Testament” song. Be sure you can sing it through 1 Samuel.

Day 4

Primary
1. Read 1 Samuel 3.
2. When Samuel was a young boy, he heard the voice of the Lord. He did not recognize it at first, but then he did as Eli told him and listened. Sometimes in our lives we hear the voice of the Lord, but maybe we – like Samuel – don’t recognize it. What can we do to help recognize the voice of the Lord? What should we do when we received promptings?
3. Watch the video about Samuel the Prophet.
4. Listen to the song “I’m Trying to Be Like Jesus.”

Youth
1. Read 1 Samuel 3.
2. President Harold B. Lee said:

The story commences with a significant statement. ‘And the child Samuel ministered unto the Lord before Eli. And the word of the Lord was precious in those days; there was no open vision.’ (1 Samuel 3:1). … That means that there was no prophet upon the earth through whom the Lord could reveal his will, either by personal experience, or by revelation.

3. One night, Samuel heard a voice calling him. Because he was young, and “did not yet know the Lord” (1 Samuel 3:7) he did not recognize the voice and thought Eli was calling him. Eli recognized that the Lord was calling Samuel and told him to listen. The Lord was displeased with Eli for allowing the iniquity in his household to continue without correction. The Lord was also giving Samuel guidance and instruction in preparation for his calling as a prophet. What can Samuel’s experience teach us about learning to recognize the Lord’s voice? If we are willing and receptive, we can grow in our ability to recognize the voice of the Lord. As we increase our ability to receive and understand personal revelation, we will be able to recognize the voice of the Lord more easily and receive His guidance and instruction.
4. Read the following story by Elder Allan F. Packer of the Seventy:

When I was a young man in high school, one of my passions was American football. I played middle linebacker. The coach worked the team hard, teaching us the basics. We practiced until the skills became natural and automatic. During one play against our biggest rival, I had an experience that has helped me over the years. We were on defense. I knew my assigned opponent, and as the play unfolded, he moved to my right into the line of scrimmage. There was a lot of noise from players and fans. I reacted as the coach had taught us and followed my man into the line, not knowing if he had the ball. To my surprise, I felt the ball partially in my hands. I gave it a tug, but my opponent didn’t let go. As we tugged back and forth, amid all the noise I heard a voice yelling, ‘Packer, tackle him!’ That was enough to bring me to my senses, so I dropped him on the spot.
I have wondered how I heard that voice above all the other noise. I had become acquainted with the voice of the coach during the practices, and I had learned to trust it. I knew that what he taught worked.
We need to be acquainted with the promptings of the Holy Ghost, and we need to practice and apply gospel teachings until they become natural and automatic. These promptings become the foundation of our testimonies. (“Finding Strength in Challenging Times!” Ensign or Liahona, May 2009, 17).

5. Watch the video “Samuel and Eli.”

Week 3

Day 1

Primary
1. Read 1 Samuel 8, 1 Samuel 9 1-2, 15-17, and 1 Samuel 10.
2. Samuel’s sons were not righteous. The people did not want to have judges anymore: the Israelites wanted to have a king. Samuel tried to warn them about all of the problems that a king would cause, but they didn’t listen. They thought a king would help them. After the Israelites insisted upon having a king to rule them, the Lord led Saul to Samuel and revealed to him that Saul was to be king. Samuel anointed Saul as the earthly leader of Israel, the Spirit of the Lord came upon Saul, and he was later publicly proclaimed as the king of Israel.
3. Saul was called of the Lord to be king. The Lord chose a righteous man to lead the children of Israel. Even though having a king is not what God said was good for them, He still selected someone righteous and honorable to take care of his people. Today God calls people, just like he called Saul, to lead the people in His church.
4. Listen to the song “I’m Trying to Be Like Jesus.”

Youth
1. Read 1 Samuel 8, 1 Samuel 9 1-2, 15-17, and 1 Samuel 10.
2. Samuel’s sons set a poor example to the people. They turned aside from the religious truths they had learned in their youth. They used their judgeships to seek monetary gain, betraying their sacred trusts by taking bribes and giving perverted judgments. But, even more than this, the Israelites as a people had become weak and sinful and were envious of surrounding kingdoms, even though their governments were wicked and oppressive. So they used Samuel’s sons as an excuse to justify their desire to be governed by the same system as the gentile nations.
3. President Ezra Taft Benson stated:

Sometimes [God] temporarily grants to men their unwise requests in order that they might learn from their own sad experiences. Some refer to this as the ‘Samuel principle.’ The children of Israel wanted a king like all the other nations. The prophet Samuel was displeased and prayed to the Lord about it. The Lord responded by saying, Samuel, ‘they have not rejected thee, but they have rejected me, that I should not reign over them.’ The Lord told Samuel to warn the people of the consequences if they had a king. Samuel gave them the warning. But they still insisted on their king. So God gave them a king and let them suffer.
Sometimes in our attempts to mimic the world, and contrary to the prophet’s counsel, we run after the world’s false educational, political, musical, and dress ideas. New worldly standards take over, a gradual breakdown occurs, and finally, after much suffering, a humble people are ready to be taught once again a higher law.

4. After the Israelites insisted upon having a king to rule them, the Lord led Saul to Samuel and revealed to him that Saul was to be king. God chose Saul to be king through prophecy and revelation. This is also how He calls men and women to serve in His Church today. Samuel anointed Saul as the earthly leader of Israel. After Samuel anointed Saul, he prophesied that Saul would have three experiences as he traveled. One of these would involve meeting a group of prophets who would prophesy, or speak inspired words.
5. According to 1 Samuel 10:7, who was with Saul? What truth can we learn about those who are called to serve God? (God will be with those He calls to serve Him as they act in righteousness.) People who knew Saul were surprised to see him prophesy with the group of prophets. After this event, Samuel gathered the Israelites together and reminded them that they had rejected the Lord by seeking to have a king. He then announced that Saul was the man whom the Lord had chosen to be the earthly leader of Israel.

Day 2

Primary
1. Read 1 Samuel 13:1-14 and 1 Samuel 15.
2. At first, Saul was a righteous king. One day, the army of Israel was waiting for Samuel to come make a sacrifice. Samuel was late, and the people got impatient. Saul burned the sacrifices himself, which he was not allowed to do.
3. Later, the Lord sent the Israelites to destroy the Amalekites. He told them to destroy everything they had, even their animals. Instead, Saul had the people save the best animals and offered them as a sacrifice. The Lord said that to obey was better than sacrifices. Saul was not obeying the Lord, and so Samuel told Saul that he was not going to be the king anymore. The Lord would choose someone else to be king.
4. Watch the video about King Saul.

Youth
1. Read 1 Samuel 13:1-14 and 1 Samuel 15.
2. The prophet Samuel had previously told Saul that he was to go to Gilgal and wait seven days for Samuel to come and offer sacrifices to the Lord (1 Samuel 10:8). This sacrifice would be a way to seek the Lord’s blessings before the Israelite army went into battle. It would also help the soldiers dedicate themselves to the Lord and strengthen their faith. It was important for Saul to wait for Samuel because Saul was not authorized to perform the sacrifice. What did Saul do when Samuel was late to offer the sacrifice? What did Samuel tell him when he came? (1 Samuel 13:8-14)
3. Sometimes we might be tempted to try to justify our disobedience to some commandments because we are obedient to others. The Lord gave Saul a second chance to prove his obedience. He commanded Saul to destroy all the Amalekites and their livestock. Did Saul obey this commandment? (1 Samuel 15: 7-9) The Lord told Samuel that Saul had turned back from following Him and had disobeyed His commandments. Samuel was grieved and visited Saul. What did Saul say he had done that made it all right that he did not follow the commandment exactly? (1 Samuel 15:20-22) What does Samuel say was more important than making animal sacrifices to the Lord?
4. Saul was given specific instructions by a prophet of God to lead the armies of Israel against the Amalekites. But instead, Saul rationalized and compromised those instructions. He acted on his own. He did that which he reasoned should be done rather than obey with exactness that which the Lord had instructed him to do through the prophet Samuel.
5. Why does Saul say he disobeyed? (1 Samuel 15:24) Seeking to please others rather than the Lord can lead us to disobey His commandments.

Day 3

Primary
1. Read 1 Samuel 16.
2. The Lord sent Samuel to find the next king of Israel. He told Samuel that the king would be one of Jesse’s sons. He told Samuel that he was not going to choose based on how tall, or strong, or handsome the men were, because the Lord can see into your heart. The Lord wanted someone with a faithful heart, and so He chose David.
3. Watch the video about Young David.
4. Listen to the song “A Child’s Prayer.”

Youth
1. Read 1 Samuel 16.
2. After rejecting Saul as the king of Israel, the Lord sent Samuel to Bethlehem to find a new king among the sons of Jesse. Many of the sons were tall and strong, but the Lord told Samuel not to look at their height or physical appearances, because He was looking for someone with good internal qualities.
3. Read 1 Samuel 16:7.

But the Lord said unto Samuel, Look not on his countenance, or on the height of his stature; because I have refused him: for the Lord seeth not as man seeth; for man looketh on the outward appearance, but the Lord looketh on the heart.

4. Elder Marvin J. Ashton of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles said,

When the Lord measures an individual, … He measures the heart as an indicator of the person’s capacity and potential to bless others. Why the heart? Because the heart is a synonym for one’s entire make-up. The measure of our hearts is the measure of our total performance. As used by the Lord, the ‘heart’ of a person describes his effort to better self, or others, or the conditions he confronts.

5. After Samuel anointed David to be the next king, we return to Saul. Saul had seriously offended God by disobeying His commandments. Because of his sins, he felt troubled. (If you read 1 Samuel 16:14, you will see that it says he was troubled by an evil spirit from the Lord. If you click on footnote C, however, you will see that the Joseph Smith translation says it should read an evil spirit which was NOT of the Lord. Remember this correction of translation as you read.) His servants suggested sending for someone to play the harp and soothe the king’s troubled heart. Who did they send for? (Hint: it was David.)
6. Saul sent messengers to Jesse and requested that David be sent to the king. David went with the king’s servants and was presented before the king. David became Saul’s armor-bearer, which was a person selected by the king to carry his armor and to stand by the king in times of danger. Hence David was introduced into the palace and the future seat of power he had been ordained to succeed. David was following God’s plan, and thereby God’s design for him was unfolding according to the divine timetable.
7. What effect did David’s playing have on Saul? (1 Samuel 16:23) “For the Strength of Youth” speaks about the power good music can have.

Music can enrich your life. It can edify and inspire you and help you draw closer to Heavenly Father. Music has a profound effect on your mind, spirit, and behavior.
Choose carefully the music you listen to. Pay attention to how you feel when you are listening. Some music can carry evil and destructive messages. Do not listen to music that encourages immorality or glorifies violence through its lyrics, beat, or intensity. Do not listen to music that uses vulgar or offensive language or promotes evil practices. Such music can dull your spiritual sensitivity.
Learn and sing the hymns. Hymns can lift your spirit, move you to righteous action, and help you withstand the temptations of the adversary.

Day 4

Primary
1. Read 1 Samuel 17.
2. Even though David was small, he overcame a big challenge. The source of his courage and strength was his faith in Jesus Christ. Sometimes we face challenges that seem as difficult as David defeating a giant, but David’s example can give us hope that the Lord will help us fight our battles.
3. Watch the video about David and Goliath.
4. Listen to the song “I Will Be Valiant.”
5. After defeating Goliath, David became famous and well-loved. King Saul made him a captain over his armies, but he was envious of him and wanted to have him killed. King Saul promised David one of his daughters to marry if he could kill 100 Philistines. He thought David would die trying to do it, but he succeeded. David married the king’s daughter, and Saul became even more afraid, angry, and jealous.

Youth
1. Read 1 Samuel 17 and 1 Samuel 18.
2. Goliath was a giant. It is written that he was more than 9 feet tall, and that his armor weighed 150 pounds. Even the tip of his spear weighed about 20 pounds. Goliath challenged the Israelites, saying that if someone could defeat him, the Philistines would become the servants of the Israelites, but if he defeated their champion then the Israelites must serve the Philistines. (1 Samuel 17:8-11) While the army of Israel was encamped against the army of the Philistines, David was at home tending his father’s sheep. David’s father gave him food to take to his brothers, who were soldiers in the army of Israel, with instructions to see how they were doing at the battlefront.
3. David heard Goliath’s challenge and he was not afraid. He offered to fight Goliath. When King Saul objected, David told how the Lord had helped him defeat a lion and a bear to protect his sheep. (1 Samuel 17:32-37) Remembering how the Lord had helped him in the past strengthened his faith to endure or overcome this new challenge. David went to fight Goliath without armor – it was offered, but it did not fit him and he was not used to it. He took the weapon he knew, a sling with smooth stones, and used it to defeat the giant. (1 Samuel 17:48-51)
4. After David defeated Goliath, he became close friends with Saul’s son Jonathan. Saul set David over the army. Jonathan could have been jealous of David’s success, but he instead rejoiced. When Jonathan gave his clothing and weapons to David, he was showing his friendship and his support of David becoming the next king. Instead, it was Saul who became jealous of David’s fame and success. Saul devised a plan to have David killed. He offered one of his daughters for David to marry if David would kill one hundred Philistines. Saul hoped that David would be killed in battle, but David was victorious and married Saul’s daughter Michal.
5. Saul and Jonathan reacted to David’s success in different ways. What lesson can we learn about dealing with the success of others from this story? Elder Jeffrey R. Holland of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles said,

There are going to be times in our lives when someone else gets an unexpected blessing or receives some special recognition. May I plead with us not to be hurt – and certainly not to feel envious — when good fortune comes to another person? We are not diminished when someone else is added upon. We are not in a race against each other. … The race we are really in is the race against sin, and surely envy is one of the most universal of those.

Week 4

Day 1

Primary
1. Read 2 Samuel 11.
2. David had many wives. One day, he saw a beautiful woman on the roof of another building and wanted her to be his wife. She was already married, so David sent her husband into the most dangerous part of a battle and he was killed. Then, David married her. What he had done was very wicked, and the Lord sent the prophet Nathan to tell him that the Lord knew what he had done.
3. Watch the video about King David.
4. King David saw somethin g that tempted him, and it led him down the wrong path. In our lives today, we sometimes have temptations that can lead us astray. Watch the video “What Should I Do When I See Pornography?” and talk to your mom or dad about it.
5. Listen to the “Books of the Old Testament” song. Be sure you can sing it through 2 Samuel!

Youth
1. Read 2 Samuel 11 and 2 Samuel 12: 1-24.
2. Look at this picture of a “switch point” on a railroad. President Gordon B. Hinckley, when working for a railroad early in his career, received a call from a railroad worker in the state of New Jersey. He said a passenger train had arrived without its baggage car.

We discovered that a baggage car that belonged in Newark, New Jersey, was in fact in New Orleans, Louisiana — 1,500 miles from its destination. Just the three-inch movement of the switch in the St. Louis yard by a careless employee had started it on the wrong track, and the distance from its true destination increased dramatically. That is the way it is with our lives. Instead of following a steady course, we are pulled by some mistaken idea in another direction. The movement away from our original destination may be ever so small, but, if continued, that very small movement becomes a great gap and we find ourselves far from where we intended to go.

3. David, who began so very righteously, made a series of small choices that took him further and further from his intended direction. We see in 2 Samuel 11:1-5 that he began by staying home from a battle and ended by getting another man’s wife pregnant. To cover up his sin, David sent the woman’s husband into the most dangerous part of a battle, hoping he would be killed. When he was killed, David married the man’s wife.
4. David’s temptation led him into much more serious sins because he did not stop, turn away, and repent. Today, we need to guard ourselves from falling into a similar trap. Watch the video “What Should I Do When I See Pornography?”
5. Listen to the “Books of the Old Testament” song. Be sure you can sing it through 2 Samuel!

Day 2

Primary
1. Read 1 Kings 3.
2. David’s son Solomon was king after him. He loved the Lord. One night, in a dream, the Lord asked Solomon what he wanted. Solomon asked the Lord for an understanding heart so that he could rule the people of Israel wisely. This request pleased the Lord, and he made Solomon wise. How did his judgement about the baby show that he had an understanding heart?
3. Watch the video about King Solomon.
4. Listen to the song “I’m Trying to Be Like Jesus.”
5. Listen to the “Books of the Old Testament” song. Be sure you can sing it through 1 Kings!

Youth
1. Read 1 Kings 3.
2. David’s son Solomon was king after him. He loved the Lord. One night, in a dream, the Lord asked Solomon what he wanted. What did Solomon ask for? Why? (1 Kings 3:9)
3. How did the Lord feel about this request? What did he give Solomon as a result? (1 Kings 3:10-14) When we selflessly seek the Lord’s help to serve others, He will magnify our abilities to serve.
4. Solomon went to Jerusalem, worshipped the Lord, and provided a feast for all his servants. During the feast two women petitioned King Solomon to judge a difficult circumstance. The two women lived with each other and bore children about the same time. One night one of the women woke up to find that her baby had died. Rather than mourn the loss of her baby, she switched her dead baby with the other woman’s baby. The next morning, when the second woman awoke to nurse her child, she found a dead baby that was not her son. The first woman denied the other woman’s accusation fervently. They sought King Solomon’s judgment to settle the matter. How did Solomon say he would settle the dispute? (1 Kings 3:24-25) How did the women respond? How did King Solomon respond wisely to their answers? (1 Kings 3:26-27)
5. Listen to the “Books of the Old Testament” song. Be sure you can sing it through 1 Kings!

Day 3

Primary
1. Read 1 Kings 8.
2. For the Israelites, building and dedicating the temple was an opportunity to turn their hearts to the Lord and recommit to “walk in all his ways.” We walk in the ways of the Lord today by keeping his commandments. For example, when we read the scriptures, say our prayers, or take the sacrament, we are “walking in the ways of the Lord.” The people of Israel made the temple as special as they could, to show how much they loved the Lord.
3. Watch the video about the temple.
4. Listen to the song “I Will Be Valiant.”

Youth
1. Read 1 Kings 8.
2. David had desired to build a temple, but the Lord instructed him not to. The Lord blessed Solomon and established him as a wise and prosperous ruler. King Solomon built a temple and dedicated it to the Lord. The Lord accepted the temple as a place where He could dwell among His people if they remained faithful to Him.
3. While the people were building the temple, the word of the Lord came to Solomon. Read 1 Kings 6:12-13 to see what promise the Lord made to Solomon and his people. We see that if we walk in the Lord’s ways, then the Lord will be with us in His temple.
4. Solomon’s temple was different than our temples today because it was patterned after the tabernacle the children of Israel carried with them through the wilderness. Nevertheless, like the ancient tabernacle and the temples today, the temple Solomon built was a symbol of the Lord’s presence with His people. By making every effort to be worthy to enter and serve in the temple, we demonstrate our desire to enjoy His presence.
5. If we worship the Lord in the temple, then the Lord may grant us blessings to help us with challenges we face. President Gordon B. Hinckley said:

The temple is … a place of personal inspiration and revelation. Legion are those who in times of stress, when difficult decisions must be made and perplexing problems must be handled, have come to the temple in a spirit of fasting and prayer to seek divine direction. Many have testified that while voices of revelation were not heard, impressions concerning a course to follow were experienced at that time or later which became answers to their prayers.

Day 4

Primary
1. Read 1 Kings 11.
2. King Solomon had many wives. Some of his wives were not Israelites and did not worship the Lord. They convinced Solomon to worship their idols, too. This
3. Watch the video about the divided kingdom.
4. Listen to the song “A Child’s Prayer.”

Youth
1. Read 1 Kings 11.
2. In Solomon’s later years, he disobeyed the Lord’s commandments by marrying many wives outside the covenant. Some of Solomon’s wives encouraged him to worship idols and turn his heart away from the Lord. Solomon’s decision to marry outside of the covenant not only turned his heart away from God but also influenced others to turn their hearts away from God.
3. If we marry in the covenant, our hearts are more likely to turn toward God and we can receive the full blessings of the gospel. Church leaders have counseled youth to be discerning regarding those they date.

Choose to date only those who have high moral standards and in whose company you can maintain your standards. Remember that a young man and a young woman on a date are responsible to protect each other’s honor and virtue. …
As you enter your adult years, make dating and marriage a high priority. Seek a companion who is worthy to go to the temple to be sealed to you for time and all eternity. Marrying in the temple and creating an eternal family are essential in God’s plan of happiness. (For the Strength of Youth [booklet, 2011], 4, 5).

4. After the death of Solomon, his son Rehoboam decided to increase the people’s burdens. The people revolted and were divided into the Northern Kingdom of Israel and the Southern Kingdom of Judah. Jeroboam, king of the Northern Kingdom, introduced idolatry and other wicked practices among his people. Subsequent kings in Israel and Judah drifted further into wickedness.

You’re done with June! Please go to July!