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Come, Follow Me – Book of Mormon (May)

Welcome to May!

Links for other months: January, February, March, April, June, July, August, September, October, November, December

May, Week 1

Day 1

Primary
1. Today read Mosiah 4:1-10 .
2. There is another doctrinal mastery scripture in this chapter! Mosiah 4:9.

9 Believe in God; believe that he is, and that he created all things, both in heaven and in earth; believe that he has all wisdom, and all power, both in heaven and in earth; believe that man doth not comprehend all the things which the Lord can comprehend.

3. King Benjamin taught the importance of believing in God. How do your beliefs about God influence your actions?
4. Listen to the song “Books in the Book of Mormon.” Make sure you can sing it through Mosiah.

Youth
1. Today read Mosiah 4:1-10 .
2. There is another doctrinal mastery scripture in this chapter! Mosiah 4:9.

9 Believe in God; believe that he is, and that he created all things, both in heaven and in earth; believe that he has all wisdom, and all power, both in heaven and in earth; believe that man doth not comprehend all the things which the Lord can comprehend.

3. King Benjamin taught the importance of believing in God. How do your beliefs about God influence your actions? President Russell M. Nelson shared the following advice for those who are not sure they believe in God:

If you are not sure you even believe in God, start there. Understand that in the absence of experiences with God, one can doubt the existence of God. So, put yourself in a position to begin having experiences with Him. … Ask Him to tell you if He is really there — if He knows you. Ask Him how He feels about you. And then listen. (Russell M. Nelson, “Come, Follow Me,” Ensign or Liahona, May 2019, 90)

4. Whether you have a strong belief in God or are trying to determine what you believe, there are things each of us can do to strengthen our belief in and love for God. Elder Jeffrey R. Holland of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles taught:

A 14-year-old boy recently said to me a little hesitantly, “Brother Holland, I can’t say yet that I know the Church is true, but I believe it is.” I hugged that boy until his eyes bulged out. I told him with all the fervor of my soul that belief is a precious word, an even more precious act, and he need never apologize for “only believing.” I told him that Christ Himself said, “Be not afraid, only believe” [Mark 5:36], a phrase which, by the way, carried young Gordon B. Hinckley into the mission field. I told this boy that belief was always the first step toward conviction and that the definitive articles of our collective faith forcefully reiterate the phrase “We believe.” And I told him how very proud I was of him for the honesty of his quest. (Jeffrey R. Holland, “Lord, I Believe,” Ensign or Liahona, May 2013, 94–95)

5. Listen to the song “Books in the Book of Mormon.” Make sure you can sing it through Mosiah.

Day 2

Primary
1. Today read Mosiah 4:11-30 .
2. King Benjamin taught that when we come unto Christ and receive a remission of our sins, we are “filled with the love of God.” This leads us to be loving and kind toward others. If we remember God’s greatness, humble ourselves, pray daily, and stand steadfastly in the faith, then we will be filled with God’s love, retain a remission of our sins, and grow in knowledge.
3. Listen to the song “Love One Another.”

Youth
1. Today read Mosiah 4:11-30 .
2. If we remember God’s greatness, humble ourselves, pray daily, and stand steadfastly in the faith, then we will be filled with God’s love, retain a remission of our sins, and grow in knowledge.
3. Read the following statement by Elder Jeffrey R. Holland of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles.

Don’t we all cry out for help and hope and answers to prayers? Don’t we all beg for forgiveness for mistakes we have made and troubles we have caused? Don’t we all implore that grace will compensate for our weaknesses, that mercy will triumph over justice at least in our case? Little wonder that King Benjamin says we obtain a remission of our sins by pleading to God, who compassionately responds, but we retain a remission of our sins by compassionately responding to the poor who plead to us. [see Mosiah 4:11–12, 20, 26] (Jeffrey R. Holland, “Are We Not All Beggars?” Ensign or Liahona, Nov. 2014, 41).

4. After King Benjamin taught his people how to retain a remission of their sins and be saved, he warned them about what might cause them to “perish,” or become spiritually lost and separated from God. If we are not careful about our thoughts, words, and deeds and do not keep the commandments or continue in the faith of Jesus Christ throughout our lives, we will perish. Read the following analogy and counsel from President Boyd K. Packer (1924–2015) of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles:

As you learn to control your thoughts, you can overcome habits, even degrading personal habits. You can gain courage, conquer fear, and have a happy life. I had been told … as I grew up that thoughts must be controlled, but no one told me how. I’ve thought about this over the years and have decided that the mind is like a stage. During every waking moment the curtain is up. There is always some act being performed on that stage. It may be a comedy, a tragedy, interesting or dull, good or bad; but always there is some act playing on the stage of your mind.

Have you noticed that shady little thoughts may creep in from the wings and attract your attention in the middle of almost any performance and without any real intent on your part? … If you permit them to go on, all thoughts of any virtue will leave the stage. … What do you do at a time like that, when the stage of your mind is commandeered by the imps of unclean thinking … ? If you can fill your mind with clean and constructive thoughts, then there will be no room for these persistent imps, and they will leave” (Boyd K. Packer, “Worthy Music, Worthy Thoughts,” New Era, Apr. 2008, 7–8).

5. Watch the video “King Mosiah Teaches His People to Believe in God.”

Day 3

Primary
1. Read Mosiah 5.
2. Mosiah 5 contains the conclusion of King Benjamin’s address to his people, the record of which begins in Mosiah 2. As a result of their faith in King Benjamin’s words, the people experienced a mighty change of heart. They entered into a covenant with God and took upon themselves the name of Jesus Christ. As our hearts are changed through the Spirit of the Lord, we lose the desire to do evil and gain the desire to do good continually.
3. Listen to the song “I Will Be Valiant.”

Youth
1. Read Mosiah 5.
2. After King Benjamin taught his people about the mission of Jesus Christ, the people repented and received a remission of their sins and “were filled with joy” (see Mosiah 4:2–3). Read Mosiah 5:2–4. As our hearts are changed through the Spirit of the Lord, we lose the desire to do evil and gain the desire to do good continually.
3. For most people, experiencing a mighty change of heart is a process that occurs throughout their lives, not a single event. Read the following statement by President Ezra Taft Benson (1899–1994):

“Becoming Christlike is a lifetime pursuit and very often involves growth and change that is slow, almost imperceptible. …

“… True repentance involves a change of heart and not just a change of behavior. … Most repentance does not involve sensational or dramatic changes, but rather is a step-by-step, steady, and consistent movement toward godliness” (Ezra Taft Benson, “A Mighty Change of Heart,” Ensign, Oct. 1989, 5).

4. As we make and keep sacred covenants, we take upon ourselves the name of Jesus Christ. Elder David A. Bednar of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles explained what it means to be “steadfast and immovable”:

The word ‘steadfast’ is used to suggest fixed in position, solid and firm, unshaken and resolute (Oxford English Dictionary Online, 2nd ed. [1989], “Steadfast”). The word ‘immovable’ is used to indicate that a person or thing is unalterable, firmly secured, and not subject to change. It also signifies the quality of being unyielding and incapable of being diverted from one’s purpose (Oxford English Dictionary Online, “Immovable”). Thus, a person who is steadfast and immovable is solid, firm, resolute, firmly secured, and incapable of being diverted from a primary purpose or mission” (David A. Bednar, “Steadfast and Immovable, Always Abounding in Good Works,” New Era, Jan. 2008, 2).

5. Watch the video “The People of King Benjamin Make a Covenant.”

Day 4

Primary
1. Today read Mosiah 6.
2. After speaking to the people, King Benjamin conferred the kingdom on his son Mosiah. Read Mosiah 6:6-7. How did Mosiah follow his father’s example and help his people continue to experience a mighty change in their hearts?
3. Listen to the song “Help Me, Dear Father.”

Youth
1. Today read Mosiah 6.
2. After speaking to the people, King Benjamin conferred the kingdom on his son Mosiah. Read Mosiah 6:6-7. How did Mosiah follow his father’s example and help his people continue to experience a mighty change in their hearts?
3. A change of heart is more than just a change of behavior. When we experience a change of heart, we become new people, changed through the power of the Savior’s Atonement. Elder David A. Bednar of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles explained:

The gospel of Jesus Christ encompasses much more than avoiding, overcoming, and being cleansed from sin and the bad influences in our lives; it also essentially entails doing good, being good, and becoming better. … This mighty change is not simply the result of working harder or developing greater individual discipline. Rather, it is the consequence of a fundamental change in our desires, our motives, and our natures made possible through the Atonement of Christ the Lord (David A. Bednar, “Clean Hands and a Pure Heart,” Ensign or Liahona, Nov. 2007, 81–82).

Week 2

Day 1

Primary
1. Today read Mosiah 7.
2. While King Mosiah’s people were enjoying “continual peace” in Zarahemla (Mosiah 7:1), their thoughts turned to another group of Nephites, who many years before had left to dwell in the land of Lehi-Nephi. Generations had passed, and Mosiah’s people had heard nothing from them. So, Mosiah asked Ammon to lead a search party to find the Nephites who had left. The search party found that these Nephites, “because of iniquity” (Mosiah 7:24), were in captivity to the Lamanites. But with the arrival of Ammon and his brethren, suddenly there was hope for deliverance.
3. Here is a diagram to help you understand who was going where in this chapter.
4. Listen to the song “I Will Be Valiant.”

Youth
1. Today read Mosiah 7.
2. While King Mosiah’s people were enjoying “continual peace” in Zarahemla (Mosiah 7:1), their thoughts turned to another group of Nephites, who many years before had left to dwell in the land of Lehi-Nephi. Generations had passed, and Mosiah’s people had heard nothing from them. So, Mosiah asked Ammon to lead a search party to find the Nephites who had left. The search party found that these Nephites, “because of iniquity” (Mosiah 7:24), were in captivity to the Lamanites. But with the arrival of Ammon and his brethren, suddenly there was hope for deliverance.
3. Here is a diagram to help you understand who was going where in this chapter.
4. When King Benjamin’s father (Mosiah) was king, a man named Zeniff left Zarahemla with a group of people to reclaim the land of Nephi (see Mosiah 9:3–4). Zeniff’s group was not heard from for many years, so the next king, Mosiah (King Benjamin’s son), sent a group led by Ammon to search for them (see Mosiah 7:1–3). They found Zeniff’s people, who were being led by Zeniff’s grandson, King Limhi. Limhi’s people had been enslaved by the Lamanites “because of [their] iniquities” (Mosiah 7:20).
5. Sometimes we’re like these captive Nephites, suffering because of our sins, wondering how we’ll ever find peace again. Sometimes we’re like Ammon, feeling prompted to reach out to others and eventually finding that our efforts have inspired them to “lift up [their] heads, and rejoice, and put [their] trust in God” (Mosiah 7:19). No matter our circumstances, we all need to repent and “turn to the Lord with full purpose of heart,” with faith that “he will … deliver [us]” (Mosiah 7:33).

Day 2

Primary
1. Read Mosiah 8.
2. King Limhi told Ammon that he had sent a search party to find Zarahemla, but they had not been successful. They had instead brought back relics from the land northward, including a record written on 24 gold plates (see Mosiah 8:7–9). King Limhi hoped that Ammon could translate the record or knew someone who could (see Mosiah 8:6, 11–12). Read Mosiah 8:13–14, looking for who Ammon said could translate the record and why.
3. Here is that diagram again.
4. Listen to the song “Help Me, Dear Father.”

Youth
1. Read Mosiah 8.
2. King Limhi told Ammon that he had sent a search party to find Zarahemla, but they had not been successful. They had instead brought back relics from the land northward, including a record written on 24 gold plates (see Mosiah 8:7–9). King Limhi hoped that Ammon could translate the record or knew someone who could (see Mosiah 8:6, 11–12). Read Mosiah 8:13–14, looking for who Ammon said could translate the record and why.
3. Here is that diagram again.
4. The Guide to the Scriptures explains the role of a seer as follows:

A person authorized of God to see with spiritual eyes things that God has hidden from the world (Moses 6:35–38). He is a revelator and a prophet (Mosiah 8:13–16). In the Book of Mormon, Ammon taught that only a seer could use special interpreters, or a Urim and Thummim (Mosiah 8:13; 28:16). A seer knows the past, present, and future. Anciently, a prophet was often called a seer (1 Sam. 9:9; 2 Sam. 24:11).

Joseph Smith is the great seer of the latter days (D&C 21:1; 135:3). In addition, the First Presidency and the Council of the Twelve are sustained as prophets, seers, and revelators. (Guide to the Scriptures, “Seer,” scriptures.ChurchofJesusChrist.org)

5. What do prophets do for us? Elder Neil L. Andersen of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles explained:

The most important role of the Lord’s prophet is to teach us of the Savior and lead us to Him. …

A prophet is a watchman on the tower, protecting us from spiritual dangers we may not see. …

… For those diligently seeking eternal life, the prophet’s voice brings spiritual safety in very turbulent times. …

A prophet does not stand between you and the Savior. Rather, he stands beside you and points the way to the Savior. A prophet’s greatest responsibility and most precious gift to us is his sure witness, his certain knowledge, that Jesus is the Christ. Like Peter of old, our prophet declares, “[He is] the Christ, the Son of the living God” [Matthew 16:16].

In a future day, looking back on our mortality, we will rejoice that we walked the earth at the time of a living prophet. (Neil L. Andersen, “The Prophet of God,” Ensign or Liahona, May 2018, 25–27)

Day 3

Primary
1. Today read Mosiah 9.
2. Zeniff was so focused on returning to the land of Nephi and rebuilding the cities there that he neglected to consider some of the negative consequences that could come from his decision. After experiencing some of the consequences, Zeniff and his people turned to the Lord in faith.
3. Watch the video Mosiah and Zeniff.

Youth
1. Today read Mosiah 9.
2. Is it possible to be so focused on something we want that we make decisions without considering the possible consequences? Zeniff was so focused on returning to the land of Nephi and rebuilding the cities there that he neglected to consider some of the negative consequences that could come from his decision. After experiencing some of the consequences, Zeniff and his people turned to the Lord in faith.
3. The sun is 400 times the size of the moon, so how can the moon eclipse, or block, the sun’s light and warmth? Because the moon is so much closer to the earth than the sun, it can appear to be similar in size to the sun and block its light. Even something as small as your thumb can block your view of the sun if you hold it close enough to your eye. Elder Gary E. Stevenson of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles explained how a solar eclipse can be an analogy for our spiritual lives.

In the same manner that the very small moon can block the magnificent sun, extinguishing its light and warmth, a spiritual eclipse can occur when we allow minor and troublesome obstructions—those we face in our daily lives—to get so close that they block out the magnitude, brightness, and warmth of the light of Jesus Christ and His gospel. (Gary E. Stevenson, “Spiritual Eclipse,” Ensign or Liahona, Nov. 2017, 45)

What are some of the smaller things we sometimes focus on that could obscure our focus on Jesus Christ and His gospel?

4. In a previous lesson, you learned that Zeniff led a group of people from the land of Zarahemla back to the land of Nephi. Zeniff had a great desire to inherit this land, but his focus led to problems for him and his people. Being overzealous and slow to remember the Lord led him and his people to negative consequences.

Day 4

Primary
1. Read Mosiah 10.
2. Mosiah 9 and 10 recount two times when the Lamanites came to battle against Zeniff and his people. Zeniff’s people behaved differently each time, with a different result. Read the following chart. If we pray and go forth in faith, we can face our challenges in the strength of the Lord.
3. Watch the video “Zeniff.”
4. Listen to the song “Love One Another.”

Youth
1. Read Mosiah 10.
2. Mosiah 9 and 10 recount two times when the Lamanites came to battle against Zeniff and his people. Zeniff’s people behaved differently each time, with a different result. Read the following chart.
3. If we pray and go forth in faith, we can face our challenges in the strength of the Lord. Read the following statement by Elder David A. Bednar of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles.

Blessings require some effort on our part before we can obtain them, and prayer, as ‘a form of work, … is an appointed means for obtaining the highest of all blessings’ [Bible Dictionary, “Prayer”]. We press forward and persevere in the consecrated work of prayer, after we say ‘amen,’ by acting upon the things we have expressed to Heavenly Father. (David A. Bednar, “Ask in Faith,” Ensign or Liahona, May 2008, 95).

4. Before Zeniff and his people went to battle the second time, Zeniff explained to his people why the Lamanites were filled with hatred for the Nephites. Read Mosiah 10:11–17, looking for reasons why the descendants of Laman and Lemuel continued to hate the descendants of Nephi. Why did the Lamanites hate the Nephites so intensely? According to verse 11, how can a person’s anger affect his or her family, now and in the future?
5. Read the following statement by Elder Bednar. As a stake president, Elder Bednar would visit people who had stopped coming to church because they had taken offense at the words or actions of another person. Look for how taking offense and holding on to anger can prevent individuals and their children from knowing the Lord and His strength.

As we talked, eyes often were moist with tears as these good people recalled the confirming witness of the Holy Ghost and described their prior spiritual experiences. … However, they were not presently participating in Church activities and meetings.

“And then I would say something like this. ‘Let me make sure I understand what has happened to you. Because someone at church offended you, you have not been blessed by the ordinance of the sacrament. You have withdrawn yourself from the constant companionship of the Holy Ghost. Because someone at church offended you, you have cut yourself off from priesthood ordinances and the holy temple. You have discontinued your opportunity to serve others and to learn and grow. And you are leaving barriers that will impede the spiritual progress of your children, your children’s children, and the generations that will follow’. (David A. Bednar, “And Nothing Shall Offend Them,” Ensign or Liahona, Nov. 2006, 89)

Week 3

Day 1

Primary
1. Today read Mosiah 11.
2. We usually try to warn people we love about decisions that could bring pain and suffering. The Lord sent Abinadi with the message for King Noah and his people to repent and avoid the suffering that could come because of their sinful behaviors.
3. Watch the video “Abinadi and King Noah.”

Youth
1. Today read Mosiah 11.
2. We usually try to warn people we love about decisions that could bring pain and suffering. The Lord sent Abinadi with the message for King Noah and his people to repent and avoid the suffering that could come because of their sinful behaviors.
3. Elder D. Todd Christofferson of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles explained how we might view the invitation to repent from prophets.

I have long been impressed by, and have also felt, the yearning love of the prophets of God in their warnings against sin. They are not motivated by a desire to condemn. Their true desire mirrors the love of God; in fact, it is the love of God. They love those to whom they are sent, whoever they may be and whatever they may be like. Just as the Lord, His servants do not want anyone to suffer the pains of sin and poor choices. (D. Todd Christofferson, “The Love of God,” Liahona, Nov. 2021, 17)

4. Today please watch the following videos:

Day 2

Primary
1. Today read Mosiah 12 and Mosiah 13.
2. After being cast into prison for testifying of King Noah’s wickedness (see Mosiah 12:9–17), Abinadi was brought before Noah and his priests. Abinadi rebuked them for pretending to understand and teach God’s word when they did not apply their hearts to understanding. Noah’s priests claimed to teach the law of Moses, but they did not keep the law of Moses nor obey the Ten Commandments. Abinadi taught Noah and his priests the importance of keeping the commandments (see Mosiah 12:25–37).
3. Watch another video which is also called “Abinadi and King Noah.”
4. Listen to the song “I Will Be Valiant.”

Youth
1. Today read Mosiah 12 and Mosiah 13.
2. After being cast into prison for testifying of King Noah’s wickedness (see Mosiah 12:9–17), Abinadi was brought before Noah and his priests. Abinadi rebuked them for pretending to understand and teach God’s word when they did not apply their hearts to understanding. Noah’s priests claimed to teach the law of Moses, but they did not keep the law of Moses nor obey the Ten Commandments. Abinadi taught Noah and his priests the importance of keeping the commandments (see Mosiah 12:25–37).
3. One truth we can learn from Mosiah 13:11 is that the commandments of God need to be written in our hearts. What do you think it means to have commandments written in our hearts? Can people be obedient to a commandment without having it written in their hearts? Why or why not? President Bonnie L. Oscarson, former Young Women General President, taught important truths that can help us understand what it means to have the commandments written in our hearts:

We need to get the gospel from our heads into our hearts! It is possible for us to merely go through the motions of living the gospel because it is expected or because it is the culture in which we have grown up or because it is a habit. …

We all need to seek to have our hearts and very natures changed so that we no longer have a desire to follow the ways of the world but to please God. (Bonnie L. Oscarson, “Do I Believe?” Ensign or Liahona, May 2016, 88)

4. In addition to not having the Ten Commandments written in their hearts, Noah and his priests did not understand the purpose of the law of Moses. Read Mosiah 13:28–32, looking for the purpose of the law of Moses. What did Abinadi want the priests of Noah to understand about the law of Moses? President Dallin H. Oaks of the First Presidency taught about the need for Jesus Christ:

Men and women … can bring to pass great things. But after all our obedience and good works, we cannot be saved from death or the effects of our individual sins without the grace extended by the atonement of Jesus Christ. The Book of Mormon makes this clear. It teaches that “salvation doth not come by the law alone” (Mosiah 13:28). In other words, salvation does not come simply by keeping the commandments. “By the law no flesh is justified” (2 Nephi 2:5) … Man cannot earn his own salvation. (Dallin H. Oaks, “Another Testament of Jesus Christ,” Ensign, Mar. 1994, 67)

5. Watch the following videos.

Day 3

Primary
1. Read Mosiah 14 and Mosiah 15.
2. Although King Noah was ready to kill him, Abinadi knew that God would allow him to finish the message he was sent to deliver. Noah and his priests needed to hear the message that God calls all prophets to teach that Jesus Christ is our Redeemer.
3. Listen to the song “Help Me, Dear Father.”

Youth
1. Read Mosiah 14 and Mosiah 15.
2. Abinadi’s message to King Noah and the priests centered on Jesus Christ. He taught the truth that we can only be saved through the redemption of Jesus Christ (see Mosiah 13:33; 16:15). Elder D. Todd Christofferson of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles taught:

Among the most significant of Jesus Christ’s descriptive titles is Redeemer. … The word redeem means to pay off an obligation or a debt. Redeem can also mean to rescue or set free as by paying a ransom. If someone commits a mistake and then corrects it or makes amends, we say he has redeemed himself. Each of these meanings suggests different facets of the great Redemption accomplished by Jesus Christ through His Atonement, which includes, in the words of the dictionary, “to deliver from sin and its penalties, as by a sacrifice made for the sinner.” (D. Todd Christofferson, “Redemption,” Ensign or Liahona, May 2013, 109)

3. Abinadi taught about Jesus Christ’s roles as the Son of God and as a Father. A father is someone who gives life. Jesus Christ is like a father to us because He can give us immortality and eternal life. It does not mean that He and Heavenly Father are the same person. Read Mosiah 15:1–9, looking for reasons why Jesus Christ may be referred to as our Eternal Father. Elder Jeffrey R. Holland of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles explained:

As Abinadi taught, Christ was “conceived by the power of God” (Mosiah 15:3] and therefore has the powers of the Father within him. In addition to that divine lineal relationship, Christ also acts as the Father in that he is the Creator of heaven and earth (see Mosiah 15:4), is the father of our spiritual rebirth and salvation, and is faithful in honoring — and therefore claiming the power of — the will of his Father above that of his own will. (Jeffrey R. Holland, Christ and the New Covenant: The Messianic Message of the Book of Mormon [1997], 183–84)

Day 4

Primary
1. Read Mosiah 17.
2. Large fires can start from a single spark. Abinadi was only one man testifying against a powerful king and his court. His words were rejected for the most part, and he was sentenced to death. Yet his testimony of Jesus Christ sparked something inside the young priest Alma. And that spark of conversion slowly grew as Alma brought many others to repentance and faith in Jesus Christ. The flames that killed Abinadi eventually died out, but the fire of faith that his words created would have a lasting influence on the Nephites—and on people who read his words today.
3. Listen to the song “Love One Another.”

Youth
1. Read Mosiah 16 and Mosiah 17.
2. Large fires can start from a single spark. Abinadi was only one man testifying against a powerful king and his court. His words were rejected for the most part, and he was sentenced to death. Yet his testimony of Jesus Christ, who is the “light … that can never be darkened” (Mosiah 16:9), sparked something inside the young priest Alma. And that spark of conversion slowly grew as Alma brought many others to repentance and faith in Jesus Christ. The flames that killed Abinadi eventually died out, but the fire of faith that his words created would have a lasting influence on the Nephites — and on people who read his words today. Most of us will never face quite what Abinadi did because of our testimonies, but we all have moments when following Jesus Christ is a test of our courage and faith. Perhaps studying Abinadi’s testimony will fan the flames of testimony and courage in your heart as well.
3. Read Mosiah 17:11. Look for how Abinadi’s words affected King Noah. Why do you think Abinadi’s words affected King Noah the way they did? If we remain true to God in all circumstances, we can help others recognize the truth.
4. Read Mosiah 17:12. Why did King Noah fail to make the right choice and release Abinadi? Just as Abinadi is an example of someone who was true to God in all circumstances, King Noah is an example of someone who was not true to God.
5. Watch “Abinadi Suffers Death for His Faith.”

Week 4

Day 1

Primary
1. Today read Mosiah 18.
2. There is a doctrinal mastery scripture in this chapter, Mosiah 18:8-10.

8 And it came to pass that he said unto them: Behold, here are the waters of Mormon (for thus were they called) and now, as ye are desirous to come into the fold of God, and to be called his people, and are willing to bear one another’s burdens, that they may be light;

9 Yea, and are willing to mourn with those that mourn; yea, and comfort those that stand in need of comfort, and to stand as witnesses of God at all times and in all things, and in all places that ye may be in, even until death, that ye may be redeemed of God, and be numbered with those of the first resurrection, that ye may have eternal life—

10 Now I say unto you, if this be the desire of your hearts, what have you against being baptized in the name of the Lord, as a witness before him that ye have entered into a covenant with him, that ye will serve him and keep his commandments, that he may pour out his Spirit more abundantly upon you?

3. After teaching the people about redemption through Jesus Christ, Alma taught about the importance of baptism. From his teachings we can learn that when we are baptized, we enter into a covenant with God.
4. Watch the video “Alma at the Waters of Mormon.”
5. Listen to the song “I Will Be Valiant.”

Youth
1. Today read Mosiah 18.
2. There is a doctrinal mastery scripture in this chapter, Mosiah 18:8-10.

8 And it came to pass that he said unto them: Behold, here are the waters of Mormon (for thus were they called) and now, as ye are desirous to come into the fold of God, and to be called his people, and are willing to bear one another’s burdens, that they may be light;

9 Yea, and are willing to mourn with those that mourn; yea, and comfort those that stand in need of comfort, and to stand as witnesses of God at all times and in all things, and in all places that ye may be in, even until death, that ye may be redeemed of God, and be numbered with those of the first resurrection, that ye may have eternal life—

10 Now I say unto you, if this be the desire of your hearts, what have you against being baptized in the name of the Lord, as a witness before him that ye have entered into a covenant with him, that ye will serve him and keep his commandments, that he may pour out his Spirit more abundantly upon you?

3. After teaching the people about redemption through Jesus Christ, Alma taught about the importance of baptism. From his teachings we can learn that when we are baptized, we enter into a covenant with God. Elder D. Todd Christofferson of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles explained what a covenant is:

A covenant is an agreement between God and man, an accord whose terms are set by God (see Bible Dictionary, “Covenant,” 651). In these divine agreements, God binds Himself to sustain, sanctify, and exalt us in return for our commitment to serve Him and keep His commandments. (D. Todd Christofferson, “The Power of Covenants,” Ensign or Liahona, May 2009, 20)

4. Why is it important to understand my baptismal covenant? Elder Joseph B. Wirthlin (1917–2008) of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles taught:

I have noted throughout my life that when people come to fully understand the blessings and the power of their baptismal covenant, whether as new converts or as lifelong members of the Church, great joy comes into their lives and they approach their duties in the kingdom with contagious enthusiasm. (“Alma the Elder: A Role Model for Today,” in Heroes from the Book of Mormon [1995], 84)

5. Watch the video “Alma the Elder Teaches and Baptizes at the Waters of Mormon.